Movement disorder following herpes simplex encephalitis

D. E. Shanks, P. A. Blasco, D. P. Chason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two children, an eight-year-old girl and a seven-month-old boy, recovered from herpes simplex encephalitis with minimal neurological residua following acyclovir treatment. Subsequently, they experienced marked deterioration, interpreted as either recrudescent infection or a post-infectious phenomenon. Features of the deterioration included encephalopathy and hyperkinetic movement disorder. MRI studies showed extensive neocortical damage, without involvement of the basal ganglia, thalamus or subthalamic nuclei. With aggressive supportive care, both children made a slow, steady recovery over several months. This supportive care is best provided in a closely supervised interdisciplinary setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-352
Number of pages5
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume33
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Herpes Simplex Encephalitis
Movement Disorders
Hyperkinesis
Subthalamic Nucleus
Acyclovir
Brain Diseases
Basal Ganglia
Thalamus
Infection
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Movement disorder following herpes simplex encephalitis. / Shanks, D. E.; Blasco, P. A.; Chason, D. P.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 1991, p. 348-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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