Mucocutaneous signs of HIV disease: Part 2: Noninfectious dermatoses, oral lesions, and opportunistic neoplasms

Shannon N. Matthews, Clay J. Cockerell, Alvin E. Friedman-Kien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

HIV-Infected patients are prone to cutaneous lesions not generally found in immunocompetent persons. But also consider the possibility of HIV disease in patients who have more common inflammatory dermatoses, such as seborrheic dermatitis or psoriasis, that resist treatment. These scaly skin conditions can mimic fungal or scabietic disorders, and a biopsy is usually necessary to confirm the diagnosis. A pruritic dermatosis, such as prurigo nodularis, papular urticaria, or xerotic dermatitis, may be an early sign of HIV infection. Papular urticaria presents as widespread hivelike lesions that resemble insect bites, while xerotic dermatitis is characterized by severe dryness and crusting. Oral lesions to watch for include candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2785-2798
Number of pages14
JournalConsultant
Volume37
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1997

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Dermatitis
Skin Diseases
Hairy Leukoplakia
Prurigo
HIV
Insect Bites and Stings
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Skin
Candidiasis
Kaposi's Sarcoma
Psoriasis
HIV Infections
Neoplasms
Biopsy
Papular urticaria
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Matthews, S. N., Cockerell, C. J., & Friedman-Kien, A. E. (1997). Mucocutaneous signs of HIV disease: Part 2: Noninfectious dermatoses, oral lesions, and opportunistic neoplasms. Consultant, 37(11), 2785-2798.

Mucocutaneous signs of HIV disease : Part 2: Noninfectious dermatoses, oral lesions, and opportunistic neoplasms. / Matthews, Shannon N.; Cockerell, Clay J.; Friedman-Kien, Alvin E.

In: Consultant, Vol. 37, No. 11, 11.1997, p. 2785-2798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matthews, SN, Cockerell, CJ & Friedman-Kien, AE 1997, 'Mucocutaneous signs of HIV disease: Part 2: Noninfectious dermatoses, oral lesions, and opportunistic neoplasms', Consultant, vol. 37, no. 11, pp. 2785-2798.
Matthews, Shannon N. ; Cockerell, Clay J. ; Friedman-Kien, Alvin E. / Mucocutaneous signs of HIV disease : Part 2: Noninfectious dermatoses, oral lesions, and opportunistic neoplasms. In: Consultant. 1997 ; Vol. 37, No. 11. pp. 2785-2798.
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