Mucus fishing syndrome

James P McCulley, M. B. Moore, A. Y. Matoba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-five patients are described with a variety of external ocular diseases including keratoconjunctivitis sicca, blepharitis, and allergic conjunctivitis, who presented with persistence of symptoms or irritation, foreign body sensation, and apparent excessive mucus production, with mild conjunctival inflammation despite appropriate treatment of the underlying disease. All patients were found to have evidence of trauma to the conjunctival epithelium due to mechanical removal of the excess mucus from the surface of the globe or inferior cul-de-sac. The surface irritation created by the mechanical damage led to a further increase in mucus production, creating a cycle that we have termed mucus fishing syndrome. Cessation of this behavior coupled with ongoing therapy of the underlying disease led to resolution of signs and symptoms in all patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1262-1265
Number of pages4
JournalOphthalmology
Volume92
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Mucus
Blepharitis
Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
Allergic Conjunctivitis
Eye Diseases
Foreign Bodies
Signs and Symptoms
Epithelium
Inflammation
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

McCulley, J. P., Moore, M. B., & Matoba, A. Y. (1985). Mucus fishing syndrome. Ophthalmology, 92(9), 1262-1265.

Mucus fishing syndrome. / McCulley, James P; Moore, M. B.; Matoba, A. Y.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 92, No. 9, 1985, p. 1262-1265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCulley, JP, Moore, MB & Matoba, AY 1985, 'Mucus fishing syndrome', Ophthalmology, vol. 92, no. 9, pp. 1262-1265.
McCulley JP, Moore MB, Matoba AY. Mucus fishing syndrome. Ophthalmology. 1985;92(9):1262-1265.
McCulley, James P ; Moore, M. B. ; Matoba, A. Y. / Mucus fishing syndrome. In: Ophthalmology. 1985 ; Vol. 92, No. 9. pp. 1262-1265.
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