Multi-Site Optical Monitoring of Spinal Cord Ischemia during Spine Distraction

David R. Busch, Wei Lin, Chunyu Cai, Alissa Cutrone, Jakub Tatka, Brandon J. Kovarovic, Arjun G. Yodh, Thomas F. Floyd, James Barsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Optimal surgical management of spine trauma will restore blood flow to the ischemic spinal cord. However, spine stabilization may also further exacerbate injury by inducing ischemia. Current electrophysiological technology is not capable of detecting acute changes in spinal cord blood flow or localizing ischemia. Further, alerts are delayed and unreliable. We developed an epidural optical device capable of directly measuring and immediately detecting changes in spinal cord blood flow using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Herein we test the hypothesis that our device can continuously monitor blood flow during spine distraction. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability of our device to monitor multiple sites along the spinal cord and axially resolve changes in spinal cord blood flow. DCS-measured blood flow in the spinal cord was monitored at up to three spatial locations (cranial to, at, and caudal to the distraction site) during surgical distraction in a sheep model. Distraction was halted at 50% of baseline blood flow at the distraction site. We were able to monitor blood flow with DCS in multiple regions of the spinal cord simultaneously at ∼1 Hz. The distraction site had a greater decrement in flow than sites cranial to the injury (median -40 vs. -7%,). This pilot study demonstrated high temporal resolution and the capacity to axially resolve changes in spinal cord blood flow at and remote from the site of distraction. These early results suggest that this technology may assist in the surgical management of spine trauma and in corrective surgery of the spine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2014-2022
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of neurotrauma
Volume37
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2020

Keywords

  • blood flow
  • injury
  • monitoring
  • spinal cord
  • surgery
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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