Multimodal opioid-sparing pain management for emergent cesarean delivery under general anesthesia: a quality improvement project

Kelechi B. Anyaehie, Elaine Duryea, Jenny Wang, Chinedu Echebelem, Devin Macias, Mary Sunna, Olutoyosi Ogunkua, Girish P Joshi, Irina Gasanova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Opioid-sparing multimodal analgesic approach has been shown to provide effective postoperative pain relief and reduce postoperative opioid consumption and opioid-associated adverse effects. While many studies have evaluated analgesic strategies for elective cesarean delivery, few studies have investigated analgesic approaches in emergent cesarean deliveries under general anesthesia. The primary aim of this quality improvement project is to evaluate opioid consumption with the use of a multimodal opioid-sparing pain management pathway in patients undergoing emergent cesarean delivery under general anesthesia. Methods: Seventy-two women (age > 16 years) undergoing emergent cesarean delivery under general anesthesia before (n = 36) and after (n = 36) implementation of a multimodal opioid-sparing pain management pathway were included. All patients received a standardized general anesthetic. Prior to implementation of the pathway, postoperative pain management was primarily limited to intravenous patient-controlled opioid administration. The new multimodal pathway included scheduled acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and ultrasound-guided classic lateral transversus abdominis plane blocks with postoperative opioids reserved only for rescue analgesia. Data obtained from electronic records included demographics, intraoperative opioid use, and pain scores and opioid consumption upon arrival to the recovery room, at 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postoperatively. Results: Patients receiving multimodal opioid sparing analgesia (AFTER group) had lower opioid use for 72 h, postoperatively. Only 2 of the 36 patients (5.6%) in the AFTER group required intravenous opioids through patient-controlled analgesia while 30 out of 36 patients (83.3%) in the BEFORE group required intravenous opioids. Conclusions: Multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia is associated with reduced postoperative opioid consumption after emergent cesarean delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number239
JournalBMC Anesthesiology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Cesarean delivery
  • Emergency surgery
  • Multimodal analgesia
  • Opioid-sparing
  • Postoperative pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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