Multiple control elements are required for expression of the human CD34 gene

Hanna S. Radomska, Anne B. Satterthwaite, Timothy C. Burn, Ira A. Oliff, Daniel G. Tenen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two cis regulatory elements of the human CD34 gene, the promoter and a 3' enhancer, have previously been described. In transient transfection assays, the promoter was not sufficient to direct cell type specific expression. In contrast, the 3' enhancer was active only in CD34+ cell lines, suggesting that this element might be responsible for stem cell- restricted expression of the CD34 gene. In the current work, through deletion and transient transfection experiments, we delineated the core enhancer sequence. We examined the role of this element upon stable integration. Our data suggested the presence of additional control elements. In order to identify them, using DNaseI hypersensitivity and methylation studies, we determined the chromatin structure of the entire CD34 locus. Amongst a number of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, we detected a strong CD34+ cell type- specific site in intron 4. This region, however, did not work as an enhancer by itself. By analyzing stable transfectants and transgenic animals, we demonstrated that the 3' enhancer and intron 4 hypersensitive regions, either alone or together, did not function as a locus control region upon chromosomal integration. In contrast, a 160 kb genomic fragment encompassing the entire CD34 gene contained regulatory elements sufficient for high-level CD34 mRNA expression in murine stable lines. Our data indicate that combinatorial action of multiple, proximal and long-range, cis elements is necessary for proper regulation of CD34 expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-318
Number of pages14
JournalGene
Volume222
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 19 1998

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Chromatin
  • DNA methylation
  • DNaseI hypersensitive sites
  • Locus control region
  • Stable integration
  • Stem cell-specific

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this