Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents

Michael Labellarte, Joseph Biederman, Graham Emslie, James Ferguson, Arifulla Khan, Jon Ruckle, Randy Sallee, Mark Riddle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents and to compare pharmacokinetic data from adolescents to adults from a previous study. Method: Fluvoxamine was titrated to a target dose of 100 mg b.i.d. in children (6-11 years) and 150 mg b.i.d. in adolescents (12-17 years) with obsessive-compulsive disorder or other disorder requiring fluvoxamine treatment. Serum samples were collected over 12 hours after 12 or more consecutive doses of 25, 50, 100, and 150 mg. Results: Sixteen children (seven females, nine males) and 18 adolescents (nine females, nine males) were included in the pharmacokinetic analyses. Children demonstrated higher mean peak plasma concentration, higher mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and lower apparent oral clearance compared with adolescents. Compared with male children, female children had higher mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve, higher mean peak plasma concentration, and more reports of adverse events. However, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was not directly correlated with frequency or severity of adverse events. Pharmacokinetics were nonlinear over the dose range studied. No pharmacokinetic differences were apparent between adolescents and adults on 150 mg b.i.d. Conclusions: These pharmacokinetic results suggest that children (especially females) have a higher exposure to fluvoxamine than adolescents, whereas adolescents and adults appear to have similar exposure to fluvoxamine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1497-1505
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume43
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

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Fluvoxamine
Pharmacokinetics
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Keywords

  • Anxiety disorders
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Pediatric
  • Pharmacokinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents. / Labellarte, Michael; Biederman, Joseph; Emslie, Graham; Ferguson, James; Khan, Arifulla; Ruckle, Jon; Sallee, Randy; Riddle, Mark.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 43, No. 12, 12.2004, p. 1497-1505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Labellarte, Michael ; Biederman, Joseph ; Emslie, Graham ; Ferguson, James ; Khan, Arifulla ; Ruckle, Jon ; Sallee, Randy ; Riddle, Mark. / Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2004 ; Vol. 43, No. 12. pp. 1497-1505.
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