Myonecrosis following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting is common and associated with an increased risk of long-term mortality

Steven P. Marso, Brent D. Bliven, John A. House, Gregory F. Muehlebach, A. Michael Borkon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims We sought to evaluate the risk of long-term mortality with respect to postoperative elevation of the isoenzyme CK-MB following first-time isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Methods Patients undergoing first-time isolated CABG between September 1992 and December 2001, at the Mid America Heart Institute, were included in this registry analysis. A sole CK-MB measurement was obtained at an average of 15.2 h following CABG. The main endpoint was long-term mortality. Results There were 3667 patients included in this registry. The mean follow up was 5.1 years. The event-free survival rate was 80%, 78% and 73%, for the normal, 1-3 and >3 times by ULN groups respectively; log-rank p=0.0058. The event-free survival for the four CK-MB groups was 80%, 78%, 75% and 72% for the normal, 1-3 times, >3-5, and >5 times ULN groups respectively, log-rank p=0.0078. The CK-MB elevation following CABG remained a significant predictor following multivariate adjustment. With a point estimate of 1.04, 95% confidence limits 1.009-1.062, p=0.007. Conclusion Elevation of the isoenzyme CK-MB is an important predictor of long-term mortality following coronary bypass grafting. These data support routine use of creatinine kinase measurement following bypass surgery to further delineate long-term risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1323-1328
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean heart journal
Volume24
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

Keywords

  • Coronary artery bypass grafting
  • Creatinine kinase
  • Mortality
  • Myocardial infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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