Nasal fracture management

Minimizing secondary nasal deformities

R. J. Rohrich, Jr Adams W.P.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current management techniques for acute nasal fractures result in a high incidence of posttraumatic nasal deformity (14 to 50 percent). Associated traumatic edema, preexisting nasal deformity, and occult septal injury account for most of these acute reduction failures. Working with a detailed patient history and a physical examination that included rigid nasal endoscopy, the authors formulated a clinical algorithm for acute nasal fracture management, the use of which can reduce the incidence of posttraumatic nasal deformity. In this article, the authors review the literature, then discuss their management techniques over the past 11 years in 110 cases with a 9 percent nasal revision rate. This low incidence of revision is attributed to complete nasal assessment (bony and septum), use of outpatient controlled general anesthesia, and primary septal reconstruction in cases with severe septal fracture dislocation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-273
Number of pages8
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume106
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2000

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Nose
Incidence
General Anesthesia
Endoscopy
Physical Examination
Edema
Outpatients
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Nasal fracture management : Minimizing secondary nasal deformities. / Rohrich, R. J.; Adams W.P., Jr.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 106, No. 2, 2000, p. 266-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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