National Association of Medical Examiners position paper on the medical examiner release of organs and tissues for transplantation

J. Keith Pinckard, Charles V. Wetli, Michael A. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The medical examiner community plays a key role in the organ and tissue procurement process for transplantation. Since many, if not most, potential organ or tissue donors fall under medicolegal jurisdiction, the medical examiner bears responsibility to authorize or deny the procurement of organs or tissues on a case-by-case basis. This responsibility engenders a basic dichotomy for the medical examiner's decision-making process. In cases falling under his/her jurisdiction, the medical examiner must balance the medicolegal responsibility centered on the decedent with the societal responsibility to respect the wishes of the decedent and/or next of kin to help living patients. Much has been written on this complex issue in both the forensic pathology and the transplantation literature. Several studies and surveys of medical examiner practices, as well as suggested protocols for handling certain types of cases, are available for reference when concerns arise that procurement may potentially hinder medicolegal death investigation. It is the position of the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) that the procurement of organs and/or tissues for transplantation can be accomplished in virtually all cases, without detriment to evidence collection, postmortem examination, determination of cause and manner of death, or the conducting of criminal or civil legal proceedings. The purpose of this position paper is to review the available data, the arguments for and against medical examiner release, and to encourage the release of organs and tissues in all but the rarest of circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-207
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Tissue Transplantation
Coroners and Medical Examiners
medical examiner
Organ Transplantation
Tissue and Organ Procurement
responsibility
jurisdiction
Accidental Falls
Transplantation
Forensic Pathology
Tissue Donors
legal proceedings
death
pathology
decision-making process
Cause of Death
Autopsy
respect
examination
cause

Keywords

  • Autopsy
  • Donation
  • Forensic
  • Medical examiner
  • Transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

National Association of Medical Examiners position paper on the medical examiner release of organs and tissues for transplantation. / Pinckard, J. Keith; Wetli, Charles V.; Graham, Michael A.

In: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 202-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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