National Patterns in Prescription Opioid Use and Misuse Among Cancer Survivors in the United States

Vikram Jairam, Daniel X. Yang, Vivek Verma, James B. Yu, Henry S. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Prescription opioids are frequently prescribed to treat cancer-related pain. However, limited information exists regarding rates of prescription opioid use and misuse in populations with cancer. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and likelihood of prescription opioid use and misuse in adult cancer survivors compared with respondents without cancer and to identify characteristics associated with prescription opioid use and misuse in adult cancer survivors. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study is a retrospective, population-based study using data from 169 162 respondents to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health from January 2015 to December 2018. Survey data sets were queried for all respondents aged 18 years or older. Those with a reported history of cancer were termed cancer survivors and further divided into more recent (had cancer within 12 months of survey) and less recent (had cancer more than 12 months prior to survey) cohorts. Respondents with nonmelanoma skin cancer were excluded. Main Outcomes and Measures: Prescription opioid use and misuse within the past 12 months. Results: Among 169 162 respondents, 5139 (5.2%) were cancer survivors, with 1243 (1.2%) and 3896 (4.0%) reporting having more recent and less recent cancer histories, respectively. Higher rates of prescription opioid use were observed among more recent cancer survivors (54.3%; 95% CI, 50.2%-58.4%; odds ratio [OR], 1.86; 95% CI, 1.57-2.20; P < .001) and less recent cancer survivors (39.2%; 95% CI, 37.3%-41.2%; OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.08-1.28; P < .001) compared with respondents without cancer (30.5%, reference group). Rates of prescription opioid misuse were similar among more recent (3.5%; 95% CI, 2.4%-5.2%; OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.82-1.96; P = .36) and less recent (3.0%; 95% CI, 2.4%-3.6%; OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.83-1.28; P = .76) survivors compared with respondents without cancer (4.3%, reference group). Younger age (aged 18-34 years vs ≥65 years: OR, 7.06; 95% CI, 3.03-16.41; P < .001), alcohol use disorder (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.45-7.14; P = .005), and nonopioid drug use disorder (OR, 14.76; 95% CI, 7.40-29.44; P < .001) were associated with prescription opioid misuse among cancer survivors. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, prescription opioid use was higher among more and less recent cancer survivors compared with the population without a history of cancer. Rates of prescription opioid misuse were low and similar among all 3 cohorts. These findings suggest that higher prescription opioid use among cancer survivors may not correspond to increased short-term or long-term misuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e2013605
JournalJAMA Network Open
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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