Natural selection: Sign, sign, everywhere a sign

Stephen Wooding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural selection is an important factor influencing variation in the human genome, but most genetic studies of natural selection have focused on variants with unknown phenotypic associations. This trend is changing. New studies are rapidly revealing the effects of natural selection on genetic variants of known or likely functional importance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume14
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2004

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Genetic Selection
natural selection
Genes
Human Genome
genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Natural selection : Sign, sign, everywhere a sign. / Wooding, Stephen.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 14, No. 17, 07.09.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wooding, Stephen. / Natural selection : Sign, sign, everywhere a sign. In: Current Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 17.
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