NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and NCCN Best Practices Committee molecular profiling surveys

Razelle Kurzrock, A. Dimitrios Colevas, Anthony Olszanski, Wallace Akerley, Carlos L. Arteaga, William E. Carson, Jeffrey W. Clark, John F. DiPersio, David S. Ettinger, Robert J. Morgan, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Alan P. Venook, Christopher D. Gocke, Jonathan Tait, F. Marc Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: With advances such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) increasing understanding of the basis of cancer and its response to treatment, NCCN believes it is important to understand how molecular profiling/diagnostic testing is being performed and used at NCCN Member Institutions and their community affiliates. Methods: The NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and the NCCN Best Practices Committee gathered baseline information on the use of cancer-related molecular testing at NCCN Member Institutions and community members of the NCCN Affiliate Research Consortium through 2 separate surveys distributed in December 2013 and September 2014, respectively. Results: A total of 24 NCCN Member Institutions and 8 affiliate sites provided quantitative and qualitative data. In the context of these surveys, "molecular profiling/diagnostics" was defined as a panel of at least 10 genes examined as a diagnostic DNA test in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory. Conclusions: Results indicated that molecular profiling/diagnostics are used at 100% of survey respondents' institutions to make patient care decisions. However, challenges relating to reimbursement, lack of data regarding actionable targets and targeted therapies, and access to drugs on or off clinical trials were cited as barriers to integration of molecular profiling into patient care. Frameworks for using molecular diagnostic results based on levels of evidence, alongside continued research into the predictive value of biomarkers and targeted therapies, are recommended to advance understanding of the role of genomic biomarkers. Greater evidence and consensus regarding the clinical and cost-effectiveness of molecular profiling may lead to broader insurance coverage and increased integration into patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1337-1346
Number of pages10
JournalJNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume13
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Practice Guidelines
Molecular Pathology
Research Personnel
Patient Care
Research
Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
Biomarkers
Insurance Coverage
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials
Surveys and Questionnaires
DNA
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and NCCN Best Practices Committee molecular profiling surveys. / Kurzrock, Razelle; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Olszanski, Anthony; Akerley, Wallace; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Carson, William E.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; DiPersio, John F.; Ettinger, David S.; Morgan, Robert J.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Venook, Alan P.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Tait, Jonathan; Stewart, F. Marc.

In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Vol. 13, No. 11, 01.01.2015, p. 1337-1346.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kurzrock, R, Colevas, AD, Olszanski, A, Akerley, W, Arteaga, CL, Carson, WE, Clark, JW, DiPersio, JF, Ettinger, DS, Morgan, RJ, Schwartzberg, LS, Venook, AP, Gocke, CD, Tait, J & Stewart, FM 2015, 'NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and NCCN Best Practices Committee molecular profiling surveys', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, vol. 13, no. 11, pp. 1337-1346.
Kurzrock, Razelle ; Colevas, A. Dimitrios ; Olszanski, Anthony ; Akerley, Wallace ; Arteaga, Carlos L. ; Carson, William E. ; Clark, Jeffrey W. ; DiPersio, John F. ; Ettinger, David S. ; Morgan, Robert J. ; Schwartzberg, Lee S. ; Venook, Alan P. ; Gocke, Christopher D. ; Tait, Jonathan ; Stewart, F. Marc. / NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and NCCN Best Practices Committee molecular profiling surveys. In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 11. pp. 1337-1346.
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abstract = "Background: With advances such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) increasing understanding of the basis of cancer and its response to treatment, NCCN believes it is important to understand how molecular profiling/diagnostic testing is being performed and used at NCCN Member Institutions and their community affiliates. Methods: The NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and the NCCN Best Practices Committee gathered baseline information on the use of cancer-related molecular testing at NCCN Member Institutions and community members of the NCCN Affiliate Research Consortium through 2 separate surveys distributed in December 2013 and September 2014, respectively. Results: A total of 24 NCCN Member Institutions and 8 affiliate sites provided quantitative and qualitative data. In the context of these surveys, {"}molecular profiling/diagnostics{"} was defined as a panel of at least 10 genes examined as a diagnostic DNA test in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory. Conclusions: Results indicated that molecular profiling/diagnostics are used at 100{\%} of survey respondents' institutions to make patient care decisions. However, challenges relating to reimbursement, lack of data regarding actionable targets and targeted therapies, and access to drugs on or off clinical trials were cited as barriers to integration of molecular profiling into patient care. Frameworks for using molecular diagnostic results based on levels of evidence, alongside continued research into the predictive value of biomarkers and targeted therapies, are recommended to advance understanding of the role of genomic biomarkers. Greater evidence and consensus regarding the clinical and cost-effectiveness of molecular profiling may lead to broader insurance coverage and increased integration into patient care.",
author = "Razelle Kurzrock and Colevas, {A. Dimitrios} and Anthony Olszanski and Wallace Akerley and Arteaga, {Carlos L.} and Carson, {William E.} and Clark, {Jeffrey W.} and DiPersio, {John F.} and Ettinger, {David S.} and Morgan, {Robert J.} and Schwartzberg, {Lee S.} and Venook, {Alan P.} and Gocke, {Christopher D.} and Jonathan Tait and Stewart, {F. Marc}",
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T1 - NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and NCCN Best Practices Committee molecular profiling surveys

AU - Kurzrock, Razelle

AU - Colevas, A. Dimitrios

AU - Olszanski, Anthony

AU - Akerley, Wallace

AU - Arteaga, Carlos L.

AU - Carson, William E.

AU - Clark, Jeffrey W.

AU - DiPersio, John F.

AU - Ettinger, David S.

AU - Morgan, Robert J.

AU - Schwartzberg, Lee S.

AU - Venook, Alan P.

AU - Gocke, Christopher D.

AU - Tait, Jonathan

AU - Stewart, F. Marc

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: With advances such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) increasing understanding of the basis of cancer and its response to treatment, NCCN believes it is important to understand how molecular profiling/diagnostic testing is being performed and used at NCCN Member Institutions and their community affiliates. Methods: The NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and the NCCN Best Practices Committee gathered baseline information on the use of cancer-related molecular testing at NCCN Member Institutions and community members of the NCCN Affiliate Research Consortium through 2 separate surveys distributed in December 2013 and September 2014, respectively. Results: A total of 24 NCCN Member Institutions and 8 affiliate sites provided quantitative and qualitative data. In the context of these surveys, "molecular profiling/diagnostics" was defined as a panel of at least 10 genes examined as a diagnostic DNA test in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory. Conclusions: Results indicated that molecular profiling/diagnostics are used at 100% of survey respondents' institutions to make patient care decisions. However, challenges relating to reimbursement, lack of data regarding actionable targets and targeted therapies, and access to drugs on or off clinical trials were cited as barriers to integration of molecular profiling into patient care. Frameworks for using molecular diagnostic results based on levels of evidence, alongside continued research into the predictive value of biomarkers and targeted therapies, are recommended to advance understanding of the role of genomic biomarkers. Greater evidence and consensus regarding the clinical and cost-effectiveness of molecular profiling may lead to broader insurance coverage and increased integration into patient care.

AB - Background: With advances such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) increasing understanding of the basis of cancer and its response to treatment, NCCN believes it is important to understand how molecular profiling/diagnostic testing is being performed and used at NCCN Member Institutions and their community affiliates. Methods: The NCCN Oncology Research Program's Investigator Steering Committee and the NCCN Best Practices Committee gathered baseline information on the use of cancer-related molecular testing at NCCN Member Institutions and community members of the NCCN Affiliate Research Consortium through 2 separate surveys distributed in December 2013 and September 2014, respectively. Results: A total of 24 NCCN Member Institutions and 8 affiliate sites provided quantitative and qualitative data. In the context of these surveys, "molecular profiling/diagnostics" was defined as a panel of at least 10 genes examined as a diagnostic DNA test in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory. Conclusions: Results indicated that molecular profiling/diagnostics are used at 100% of survey respondents' institutions to make patient care decisions. However, challenges relating to reimbursement, lack of data regarding actionable targets and targeted therapies, and access to drugs on or off clinical trials were cited as barriers to integration of molecular profiling into patient care. Frameworks for using molecular diagnostic results based on levels of evidence, alongside continued research into the predictive value of biomarkers and targeted therapies, are recommended to advance understanding of the role of genomic biomarkers. Greater evidence and consensus regarding the clinical and cost-effectiveness of molecular profiling may lead to broader insurance coverage and increased integration into patient care.

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