Neighborhood-level Social Vulnerability and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Coronary Heart Disease

Graham Bevan, Ambarish Pandey, Stephanie Griggs, Jarrod E. Dalton, David Zidar, Shivani Patel, Safi U. Khan, Khurram Nasir, Sanjay Rajagopalan, Sadeer Al-Kindi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social determinants of health are implicated in the geographic variation in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The social vulnerability index (SVI) is an estimate of a neighborhood's potential for deleterious outcomes when faced with natural disasters or disease outbreaks. We sought to investigate the association of the SVI with cardiovascular risk factors and the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States at the census tract level. We linked census tract SVI with prevalence of census tract CVD risk factors (smoking, high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, low physical activity and obesity), and prevalence of CHD obtained from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system. We evaluated the association between SVI, its sub-scales, CVD risk factors and CHD prevalence using linear regression. Among 72,173 census tracts, prevalence of all cardiovascular risk factors increased linearly with SVI. A higher SVI was associated with a higher CHD prevalence (R2 = 0.17, P < 0.0001). The relationship between SVI and CHD was stronger when accounting for census-tract median age (R2 = 0.57, P < 0.0001). A multivariable linear regression model including 4 SVI themes separately explained considerably more variation in CHD prevalence than the composite SVI alone (50.0% vs 17.3%). Socioeconomic status and household composition and disability were the SVI themes most closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors and CHD prevalence. In the United States, social vulnerability can explain significant portion of geographic variation in CHD, and its risk factors. Neighborhoods with high social vulnerability are at disproportionately increased risk of CHD and its risk factors. Social determinants of health are implicated in the geographic variation in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). We investigated the association of social vulnerability index (SVI) with cardiovascular risk factors and the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States at the census tract level. We show that cardiovascular risk factors and CHD were more common with higher SVI. A multivariable linear regression model including 4 SVI themes separately explained considerably more variation in CHD prevalence than the composite SVI alone (50.0% vs 17.3%). Socioeconomic status and household composition and/or disability were the SVI themes most closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors and CHD prevalence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101182
JournalCurrent Problems in Cardiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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