Neurocognitive Outcomes at 10 Years of Age in Extremely Preterm Newborns with Late-Onset Bacteremia

For the, ELGAN Study Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the difference in 10-year neurocognitive outcomes between extremely low gestational age newborns without bacteremia and those with suspected or confirmed late-onset bacteremia. Study design Neurocognitive function was evaluated at 10 years of age in 889 children born at <28 weeks of gestation and followed from birth. Definite (culture-positive) late-onset bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 was identified in 223 children, and 129 children had suspected bacteremia. Results Infants with the lowest gestational age and birth weight z-score had the highest prevalence of definite and suspected late-onset bacteremia. Compared with peers with no or suspected bacteremia, infants with definite bacteremia performed worse on tests of general cognitive ability, language, academic achievement, and executive function, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Adjustment for low IQ attenuated the associations between bacteremia and all dysfunctions at age 10 years. Children with suspected bacteremia did not differ appreciably from those with no evidence of bacteremia. The motor domain was unaffected. Conclusions Extremely low gestational age newborns who had definite late bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 are at heightened risk of neurocognitive limitations at age 10 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-49.e1
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume187
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacteremia
Newborn Infant
Gestational Age
Aptitude
Executive Function
Birth Weight
Language
Parturition
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • academic function
  • cognition
  • executive function
  • extremely low gestational age newborn
  • neurodevelopment
  • school age
  • sensorimotor impairment
  • sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Neurocognitive Outcomes at 10 Years of Age in Extremely Preterm Newborns with Late-Onset Bacteremia. / For the; ELGAN Study Investigators.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 187, 08.2017, p. 43-49.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Neurocognitive Outcomes at 10 Years of Age in Extremely Preterm Newborns with Late-Onset Bacteremia",
abstract = "Objective To evaluate the difference in 10-year neurocognitive outcomes between extremely low gestational age newborns without bacteremia and those with suspected or confirmed late-onset bacteremia. Study design Neurocognitive function was evaluated at 10 years of age in 889 children born at <28 weeks of gestation and followed from birth. Definite (culture-positive) late-onset bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 was identified in 223 children, and 129 children had suspected bacteremia. Results Infants with the lowest gestational age and birth weight z-score had the highest prevalence of definite and suspected late-onset bacteremia. Compared with peers with no or suspected bacteremia, infants with definite bacteremia performed worse on tests of general cognitive ability, language, academic achievement, and executive function, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Adjustment for low IQ attenuated the associations between bacteremia and all dysfunctions at age 10 years. Children with suspected bacteremia did not differ appreciably from those with no evidence of bacteremia. The motor domain was unaffected. Conclusions Extremely low gestational age newborns who had definite late bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 are at heightened risk of neurocognitive limitations at age 10 years.",
keywords = "academic function, cognition, executive function, extremely low gestational age newborn, neurodevelopment, school age, sensorimotor impairment, sepsis",
author = "{For the} and {ELGAN Study Investigators} and Bright, {H. Reeve} and Kikelomo Babata and Allred, {Elizabeth N.} and Carmina Erdei and Kuban, {Karl C.K.} and Joseph, {Robert M.} and O'Shea, {T. Michael} and Alan Leviton and Olaf Dammann and Janice Ware and Taryn Coster and Brandi Hanson and Rachel Wilson and Kirsten McGhee and Patricia Lee and Aimee Asgarian and Anjali Sadhwani and Ellen Perrin and Emily Neger and Kathryn Mattern and Jenifer Walkowiak and Susan Barron and Bhavesh Shah and Rachana Singh and Anne Smith and Deborah Klein and Susan McQuiston and Lauren Venuti and Beth Powers and Ann Foley and Brian Dessureau and Molly Wood and Jill Damon-Minow and Richard Ehrenkranz and Jennifer Benjamin and Elaine Romano and Kathy Tsatsanis and Katarzyna Chawarska and Sophy Kim and Susan Dieterich and Karen Bearrs and Nancy Peters and Patricia Brown and Emily Ansusinha and Ellen Waldrep and Jackie Friedman and Gail Hounshell and Debbie Allred and Engelke, {Stephen C.} and Nancy Darden-Saad",
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AU - ELGAN Study Investigators

AU - Bright, H. Reeve

AU - Babata, Kikelomo

AU - Allred, Elizabeth N.

AU - Erdei, Carmina

AU - Kuban, Karl C.K.

AU - Joseph, Robert M.

AU - O'Shea, T. Michael

AU - Leviton, Alan

AU - Dammann, Olaf

AU - Ware, Janice

AU - Coster, Taryn

AU - Hanson, Brandi

AU - Wilson, Rachel

AU - McGhee, Kirsten

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AU - Asgarian, Aimee

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AU - Mattern, Kathryn

AU - Walkowiak, Jenifer

AU - Barron, Susan

AU - Shah, Bhavesh

AU - Singh, Rachana

AU - Smith, Anne

AU - Klein, Deborah

AU - McQuiston, Susan

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AU - Powers, Beth

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AU - Dessureau, Brian

AU - Wood, Molly

AU - Damon-Minow, Jill

AU - Ehrenkranz, Richard

AU - Benjamin, Jennifer

AU - Romano, Elaine

AU - Tsatsanis, Kathy

AU - Chawarska, Katarzyna

AU - Kim, Sophy

AU - Dieterich, Susan

AU - Bearrs, Karen

AU - Peters, Nancy

AU - Brown, Patricia

AU - Ansusinha, Emily

AU - Waldrep, Ellen

AU - Friedman, Jackie

AU - Hounshell, Gail

AU - Allred, Debbie

AU - Engelke, Stephen C.

AU - Darden-Saad, Nancy

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N2 - Objective To evaluate the difference in 10-year neurocognitive outcomes between extremely low gestational age newborns without bacteremia and those with suspected or confirmed late-onset bacteremia. Study design Neurocognitive function was evaluated at 10 years of age in 889 children born at <28 weeks of gestation and followed from birth. Definite (culture-positive) late-onset bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 was identified in 223 children, and 129 children had suspected bacteremia. Results Infants with the lowest gestational age and birth weight z-score had the highest prevalence of definite and suspected late-onset bacteremia. Compared with peers with no or suspected bacteremia, infants with definite bacteremia performed worse on tests of general cognitive ability, language, academic achievement, and executive function, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Adjustment for low IQ attenuated the associations between bacteremia and all dysfunctions at age 10 years. Children with suspected bacteremia did not differ appreciably from those with no evidence of bacteremia. The motor domain was unaffected. Conclusions Extremely low gestational age newborns who had definite late bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 are at heightened risk of neurocognitive limitations at age 10 years.

AB - Objective To evaluate the difference in 10-year neurocognitive outcomes between extremely low gestational age newborns without bacteremia and those with suspected or confirmed late-onset bacteremia. Study design Neurocognitive function was evaluated at 10 years of age in 889 children born at <28 weeks of gestation and followed from birth. Definite (culture-positive) late-onset bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 was identified in 223 children, and 129 children had suspected bacteremia. Results Infants with the lowest gestational age and birth weight z-score had the highest prevalence of definite and suspected late-onset bacteremia. Compared with peers with no or suspected bacteremia, infants with definite bacteremia performed worse on tests of general cognitive ability, language, academic achievement, and executive function, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Adjustment for low IQ attenuated the associations between bacteremia and all dysfunctions at age 10 years. Children with suspected bacteremia did not differ appreciably from those with no evidence of bacteremia. The motor domain was unaffected. Conclusions Extremely low gestational age newborns who had definite late bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 are at heightened risk of neurocognitive limitations at age 10 years.

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KW - cognition

KW - executive function

KW - extremely low gestational age newborn

KW - neurodevelopment

KW - school age

KW - sensorimotor impairment

KW - sepsis

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