Neuronal acetylcholine receptor autoimmunity

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels that are present throughout the nervous system. The muscle AChR mediates transmission at the neuromuscular junction; antibodies against the muscle AChR are the cause of myasthenia gravis. There are numerous subtypes of AChRs present throughout the nervous system. These neuronal AChRs are closely related to the muscle AChR structurally, but are pharmacologically and immunologically distinct. The ganglionic (α3-type) neuronal AChR mediates fast synaptic transmission in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric autonomic ganglia. Ganglionic AChR antibodies are found in up to 50% of patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). Patients with AAG present with severe autonomic failure. Major clinical features include orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal dysmotility, anhidrosis, bladder dysfunction, and sicca symptoms. Impaired pupillary light reflex is often seen. Like myasthenia, AAG is an antibody-mediated neurological disorder. Patients may improve with plasma exchange treatment or other immunomodulatory treatment. Experimental AAG, which recapitulates many of the features of the human disease, can be induced in rabbits by immunization against the ganglionic AChR or by passive transfer of antibodies to mice. Ganglionic AChR IgG inhibits nicotinic membrane current in cultured neuroblastoma cells. Central nervous system neuronal AChRs may also be targets of autoimmunity. For example, antibodies against α7-type AChRs have been identified in a few patients with encephalitis. It is still unclear if antibodies against receptors in the central nervous system can directly cause disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages124-128
Number of pages5
Volume1132
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1132
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Cholinergic Receptors
Autoimmunity
Neurology
Antibodies
Muscle
Muscles
Nervous System
Central Nervous System
Hypohidrosis
Pupillary Reflex
Autonomic Ganglia
Ligand-Gated Ion Channels
Immunization
Orthostatic Hypotension
Plasma Exchange
Passive Immunization
Neuromuscular Junction
Myasthenia Gravis
Nicotinic Receptors
Encephalitis

Keywords

  • Autonomic neuropathy
  • Gastrointestinal dysmotility
  • Orthostatic hypotension
  • Thymoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Vernino, S. (2008). Neuronal acetylcholine receptor autoimmunity. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1132, pp. 124-128). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1132). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1405.011

Neuronal acetylcholine receptor autoimmunity. / Vernino, Steven.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1132 2008. p. 124-128 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1132).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Vernino, S 2008, Neuronal acetylcholine receptor autoimmunity. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1132, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1132, pp. 124-128. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1405.011
Vernino S. Neuronal acetylcholine receptor autoimmunity. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1132. 2008. p. 124-128. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1405.011
Vernino, Steven. / Neuronal acetylcholine receptor autoimmunity. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1132 2008. pp. 124-128 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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