Nighttime heartburn is an under-appreciated clinical problem that impacts sleep and daytime function: The results of a Gallup survey conducted on behalf of the American Gastroenterological Association

Reza Shaker, Donald O. Castell, Philip S. Schoenfeld, Stuart J. Spechler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

336 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Although a large body of information exists about the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in general, available data specifically addressing nocturnal reflux are limited. Because nocturnal acid reflux is reported to be associated with more severe injuries such as esophagitis and stricture, as well as adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, a better understanding of the prevalence and impact of nighttime heartburn as a sign of nocturnal acid reflux events can have significant potential management implications. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of nighttime heartburn and reflux-attributed supraesophageal symptoms among patients with GERD; and the impact of nighttime heartburn on sleep and several activities of daily living that could affect quality of life. METHODS: A nationwide telephone survey of 1000 adults experiencing heartburn at least once a week was conducted by the Gallup Organization on behalf of the American Gastroenterological Association. RESULTS: Altogether, 79% of respondents reported experiencing heartburn at night. Among those, 75% reported that symptoms affected their sleep, 63% believed that heartburn negatively affected their ability to sleep well, and 40% believed that nocturnal heartburn impaired their ability to function the following day. Of the 791 respondents with nighttime heartburn, 71% reported taking over-the-counter medicine for it, but only 29% of these rated this approach extremely effective. Forty-one percent reported trying prescription medicines, and 49% of these rated this approach extremely effective. CONCLUSIONS: Nighttime heartburn occurs in a large majority of adults with GERD, resulting in sleeping difficulties and impaired next-day function. The expected result from implemented therapy for heartburn is not achieved by a sizable percentage of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1487-1493
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume98
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

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Heartburn
Sleep
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Aptitude
Surveys and Questionnaires
Acids
Esophagitis
Activities of Daily Living
Telephone
Prescriptions
Pathologic Constriction
Quality of Life
Medicine
Organizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Nighttime heartburn is an under-appreciated clinical problem that impacts sleep and daytime function: The results of a Gallup survey conducted on behalf of the American Gastroenterological Association",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Although a large body of information exists about the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in general, available data specifically addressing nocturnal reflux are limited. Because nocturnal acid reflux is reported to be associated with more severe injuries such as esophagitis and stricture, as well as adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, a better understanding of the prevalence and impact of nighttime heartburn as a sign of nocturnal acid reflux events can have significant potential management implications. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of nighttime heartburn and reflux-attributed supraesophageal symptoms among patients with GERD; and the impact of nighttime heartburn on sleep and several activities of daily living that could affect quality of life. METHODS: A nationwide telephone survey of 1000 adults experiencing heartburn at least once a week was conducted by the Gallup Organization on behalf of the American Gastroenterological Association. RESULTS: Altogether, 79{\%} of respondents reported experiencing heartburn at night. Among those, 75{\%} reported that symptoms affected their sleep, 63{\%} believed that heartburn negatively affected their ability to sleep well, and 40{\%} believed that nocturnal heartburn impaired their ability to function the following day. Of the 791 respondents with nighttime heartburn, 71{\%} reported taking over-the-counter medicine for it, but only 29{\%} of these rated this approach extremely effective. Forty-one percent reported trying prescription medicines, and 49{\%} of these rated this approach extremely effective. CONCLUSIONS: Nighttime heartburn occurs in a large majority of adults with GERD, resulting in sleeping difficulties and impaired next-day function. The expected result from implemented therapy for heartburn is not achieved by a sizable percentage of patients.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although a large body of information exists about the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in general, available data specifically addressing nocturnal reflux are limited. Because nocturnal acid reflux is reported to be associated with more severe injuries such as esophagitis and stricture, as well as adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, a better understanding of the prevalence and impact of nighttime heartburn as a sign of nocturnal acid reflux events can have significant potential management implications. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of nighttime heartburn and reflux-attributed supraesophageal symptoms among patients with GERD; and the impact of nighttime heartburn on sleep and several activities of daily living that could affect quality of life. METHODS: A nationwide telephone survey of 1000 adults experiencing heartburn at least once a week was conducted by the Gallup Organization on behalf of the American Gastroenterological Association. RESULTS: Altogether, 79% of respondents reported experiencing heartburn at night. Among those, 75% reported that symptoms affected their sleep, 63% believed that heartburn negatively affected their ability to sleep well, and 40% believed that nocturnal heartburn impaired their ability to function the following day. Of the 791 respondents with nighttime heartburn, 71% reported taking over-the-counter medicine for it, but only 29% of these rated this approach extremely effective. Forty-one percent reported trying prescription medicines, and 49% of these rated this approach extremely effective. CONCLUSIONS: Nighttime heartburn occurs in a large majority of adults with GERD, resulting in sleeping difficulties and impaired next-day function. The expected result from implemented therapy for heartburn is not achieved by a sizable percentage of patients.

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