Nivolumab versus everolimus in advanced renal-cell carcinoma

Robert J. Motzer, Bernard Escudier, David F. McDermott, Saby George, Hans J. Hammers, Sandhya Srinivas, Scott S. Tykodi, Jeffrey A. Sosman, Giuseppe Procopio, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Daniel Castellano, Toni K. Choueiri, Howard Gurney, Frede Donskov, Petri Bono, John Wagstaff, Thomas C. Gauler, Takeshi Ueda, Yoshihiko Tomita, Fabio A. SchutzChristian Kollmannsberger, James Larkin, Alain Ravaud, Jason S. Simon, Li An Xu, Ian M. Waxman, Padmanee Sharma

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Nivolumab, a programmed death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor, was associated with encouraging overall survival in uncontrolled studies involving previously treated patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma. This randomized, open-label, phase 3 study compared nivolumab with everolimus in patients with renal-cell carcinoma who had received previous treatment. METHODS A total of 821 patients with advanced clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma for which they had received previous treatment with one or two regimens of antiangiogenic therapy were randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio) to receive 3 mg of nivolumab per kilogram of body weight intravenously every 2 weeks or a 10-mg everolimus tablet orally once daily. The primary end point was overall survival. The secondary end points included the objective response rate and safety. RESULTS The median overall survival was 25.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.8 to not estimable) with nivolumab and 19.6 months (95% CI, 17.6 to 23.1) with everolimus. The hazard ratio for death with nivolumab versus everolimus was 0.73 (98.5% CI, 0.57 to 0.93; P = 0.002), which met the prespecified criterion for superiority (P≤0.0148). The objective response rate was greater with nivolumab than with everolimus (25% vs. 5%; odds ratio, 5.98 [95% CI, 3.68 to 9.72]; P<0.001). The median progression-free survival was 4.6 months (95% CI, 3.7 to 5.4) with nivolumab and 4.4 months (95% CI, 3.7 to 5.5) with everolimus (hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.03; P = 0.11). Grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 19% of the patients receiving nivolumab and in 37% of the patients receiving everolimus; the most common event with nivolumab was fatigue (in 2% of the patients), and the most common event with everolimus was anemia (in 8%). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with previously treated advanced renal-cell carcinoma, overall survival was longer and fewer grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred with nivolumab than with everolimus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1803-1813
Number of pages11
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume373
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Motzer, R. J., Escudier, B., McDermott, D. F., George, S., Hammers, H. J., Srinivas, S., Tykodi, S. S., Sosman, J. A., Procopio, G., Plimack, E. R., Castellano, D., Choueiri, T. K., Gurney, H., Donskov, F., Bono, P., Wagstaff, J., Gauler, T. C., Ueda, T., Tomita, Y., ... Sharma, P. (2015). Nivolumab versus everolimus in advanced renal-cell carcinoma. New England Journal of Medicine, 373(19), 1803-1813. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1510665