NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses

Anita E. Autry, Megumi Adachi, Elena Nosyreva, Elisa S. Na, Maarten F. Los, Peng Fei Cheng, Ege T Kavalali, Lisa M Monteggia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

932 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical studies consistently demonstrate that a single sub-psychomimetic dose of ketamine, an ionotropic glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) antagonist, produces fast-acting antidepressant responses in patients suffering from major depressive disorder, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Depressed patients report the alleviation of major depressive disorder symptoms within two hours of a single, low-dose intravenous infusion of ketamine, with effects lasting up to two weeks, unlike traditional antidepressants (serotonin re-uptake inhibitors), which take weeks to reach efficacy. This delay is a major drawback to current therapies for major depressive disorder and faster-acting antidepressants are needed, particularly for suicide-risk patients. The ability of ketamine to produce rapidly acting, long-lasting antidepressant responses in depressed patients provides a unique opportunity to investigate underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that ketamine and other NMDAR antagonists produce fast-acting behavioural antidepressant-like effects in mouse models, and that these effects depend on the rapid synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. We find that the ketamine-mediated blockade of NMDAR at rest deactivates eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinase (also called CaMKIII), resulting in reduced eEF2 phosphorylation and de-suppression of translation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Furthermore, we find that inhibitors of eEF2 kinase induce fast-acting behavioural antidepressant-like effects. Our findings indicate that the regulation of protein synthesis by spontaneous neurotransmission may serve as a viable therapeutic target for the development of fast-acting antidepressants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-96
Number of pages6
JournalNature
Volume475
Issue number7354
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 7 2011

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N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Antidepressive Agents
Ketamine
Elongation Factor 2 Kinase
Major Depressive Disorder
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Peptide Elongation Factor 2
Aptitude
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Intravenous Infusions
Synaptic Transmission
Suicide
Phosphorylation
Depression
Therapeutics
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Autry, A. E., Adachi, M., Nosyreva, E., Na, E. S., Los, M. F., Cheng, P. F., ... Monteggia, L. M. (2011). NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses. Nature, 475(7354), 91-96. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10130

NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses. / Autry, Anita E.; Adachi, Megumi; Nosyreva, Elena; Na, Elisa S.; Los, Maarten F.; Cheng, Peng Fei; Kavalali, Ege T; Monteggia, Lisa M.

In: Nature, Vol. 475, No. 7354, 07.07.2011, p. 91-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Autry, AE, Adachi, M, Nosyreva, E, Na, ES, Los, MF, Cheng, PF, Kavalali, ET & Monteggia, LM 2011, 'NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses', Nature, vol. 475, no. 7354, pp. 91-96. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10130
Autry AE, Adachi M, Nosyreva E, Na ES, Los MF, Cheng PF et al. NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses. Nature. 2011 Jul 7;475(7354):91-96. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10130
Autry, Anita E. ; Adachi, Megumi ; Nosyreva, Elena ; Na, Elisa S. ; Los, Maarten F. ; Cheng, Peng Fei ; Kavalali, Ege T ; Monteggia, Lisa M. / NMDA receptor blockade at rest triggers rapid behavioural antidepressant responses. In: Nature. 2011 ; Vol. 475, No. 7354. pp. 91-96.
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