No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors

L. Galluzzi, N. Joza, E. Tasdemir, M. C. Maiuri, M. Hengartner, J. M. Abrams, N. Tavernarakis, J. Penninger, F. Madeo, G. Kroemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As a result of the genetic experiments performed in Caenorhabditis elegans, it has been tacitly assumed that the core proteins of the 'apoptotic machinery' (CED-3, -4, -9 and EGL-1) would be solely involved in cell death regulation/execution and would not exert any functions outside of the cell death realm. However, multiple studies indicate that the mammalian orthologs of these C. elegans proteins (i.e. caspases, Apaf-1 and multidomain proteins of the Bcl-2 family) participate in cell death-unrelated processes. Similarly, loss-of-function mutations of ced-4 compromise the mitotic arrest of DNA-damaged germline cells from adult nematodes, even in a context in which the apoptotic machinery is inoperative (for instance due to mutations of egl-1 or ced-3). Moreover, EGL-1 is required for the activation of autophagy in starved nematodes. Finally, the depletion of caspase-independent death effectors, such as apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G, provokes cell death-independent consequences, both in mammals and in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). These results corroborate the conjecture that any kind of protein that has previously been specifically implicated in apoptosis might have a phylogenetically conserved apoptosis-unrelated function, most likely as part of an adaptive response to cellular stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1123
Number of pages11
JournalCell Death and Differentiation
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Cell Death
Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins
Apoptosis Inducing Factor
Apoptosis
Caspase 1
Gastrin-Secreting Cells
Mutation
Proteins
Autophagy
Caenorhabditis elegans
Caspases
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Mammals
Yeasts
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Galluzzi, L., Joza, N., Tasdemir, E., Maiuri, M. C., Hengartner, M., Abrams, J. M., ... Kroemer, G. (2008). No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. Cell Death and Differentiation, 15(7), 1113-1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2008.28

No death without life : Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. / Galluzzi, L.; Joza, N.; Tasdemir, E.; Maiuri, M. C.; Hengartner, M.; Abrams, J. M.; Tavernarakis, N.; Penninger, J.; Madeo, F.; Kroemer, G.

In: Cell Death and Differentiation, Vol. 15, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1113-1123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galluzzi, L, Joza, N, Tasdemir, E, Maiuri, MC, Hengartner, M, Abrams, JM, Tavernarakis, N, Penninger, J, Madeo, F & Kroemer, G 2008, 'No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors', Cell Death and Differentiation, vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 1113-1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2008.28
Galluzzi L, Joza N, Tasdemir E, Maiuri MC, Hengartner M, Abrams JM et al. No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. Cell Death and Differentiation. 2008 Jul;15(7):1113-1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2008.28
Galluzzi, L. ; Joza, N. ; Tasdemir, E. ; Maiuri, M. C. ; Hengartner, M. ; Abrams, J. M. ; Tavernarakis, N. ; Penninger, J. ; Madeo, F. ; Kroemer, G. / No death without life : Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. In: Cell Death and Differentiation. 2008 ; Vol. 15, No. 7. pp. 1113-1123.
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