No death without life

Vital functions of apoptotic effectors

L. Galluzzi, N. Joza, E. Tasdemir, M. C. Maiuri, M. Hengartner, J. M. Abrams, N. Tavernarakis, J. Penninger, F. Madeo, G. Kroemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As a result of the genetic experiments performed in Caenorhabditis elegans, it has been tacitly assumed that the core proteins of the 'apoptotic machinery' (CED-3, -4, -9 and EGL-1) would be solely involved in cell death regulation/execution and would not exert any functions outside of the cell death realm. However, multiple studies indicate that the mammalian orthologs of these C. elegans proteins (i.e. caspases, Apaf-1 and multidomain proteins of the Bcl-2 family) participate in cell death-unrelated processes. Similarly, loss-of-function mutations of ced-4 compromise the mitotic arrest of DNA-damaged germline cells from adult nematodes, even in a context in which the apoptotic machinery is inoperative (for instance due to mutations of egl-1 or ced-3). Moreover, EGL-1 is required for the activation of autophagy in starved nematodes. Finally, the depletion of caspase-independent death effectors, such as apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G, provokes cell death-independent consequences, both in mammals and in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). These results corroborate the conjecture that any kind of protein that has previously been specifically implicated in apoptosis might have a phylogenetically conserved apoptosis-unrelated function, most likely as part of an adaptive response to cellular stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1123
Number of pages11
JournalCell Death and Differentiation
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Cell Death
Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins
Apoptosis Inducing Factor
Apoptosis
Caspase 1
Gastrin-Secreting Cells
Mutation
Proteins
Autophagy
Caenorhabditis elegans
Caspases
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Mammals
Yeasts
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Galluzzi, L., Joza, N., Tasdemir, E., Maiuri, M. C., Hengartner, M., Abrams, J. M., ... Kroemer, G. (2008). No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. Cell Death and Differentiation, 15(7), 1113-1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2008.28

No death without life : Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. / Galluzzi, L.; Joza, N.; Tasdemir, E.; Maiuri, M. C.; Hengartner, M.; Abrams, J. M.; Tavernarakis, N.; Penninger, J.; Madeo, F.; Kroemer, G.

In: Cell Death and Differentiation, Vol. 15, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1113-1123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galluzzi, L, Joza, N, Tasdemir, E, Maiuri, MC, Hengartner, M, Abrams, JM, Tavernarakis, N, Penninger, J, Madeo, F & Kroemer, G 2008, 'No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors', Cell Death and Differentiation, vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 1113-1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2008.28
Galluzzi L, Joza N, Tasdemir E, Maiuri MC, Hengartner M, Abrams JM et al. No death without life: Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. Cell Death and Differentiation. 2008 Jul;15(7):1113-1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/cdd.2008.28
Galluzzi, L. ; Joza, N. ; Tasdemir, E. ; Maiuri, M. C. ; Hengartner, M. ; Abrams, J. M. ; Tavernarakis, N. ; Penninger, J. ; Madeo, F. ; Kroemer, G. / No death without life : Vital functions of apoptotic effectors. In: Cell Death and Differentiation. 2008 ; Vol. 15, No. 7. pp. 1113-1123.
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