No sex differences in use of dopaminergic medication in early Parkinson disease in the US and Canada - Baseline findings of a multicenter trial

Chizoba C. Umeh, Adriana Pérez, Erika F. Augustine, Rohit Dhall, Richard B. Dewey, Zoltan Mari, David K. Simon, Anne Marie A Wills, Chadwick W. Christine, Jay S. Schneider, Oksana Suchowersky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sex differences in Parkinson disease clinical features have been reported, but few studies have examined sex influences on use of dopaminergic medication in early Parkinson disease. The objective of this study was to test if there are differences in the type of dopaminergic medication used and levodopa equivalent daily dose between men and women with early Parkinson disease enrolled in a large multicenter study of Creatine as a potential disease modifying therapy - the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in Parkinson Disease Long-Term Study-1. Methods: Baseline data of 1,741 participants from 45 participating sites were analyzed. Participants from the United States and Canada were enrolled within five years of Parkinson Disease diagnosis. Two outcome variables were studied: type of dopaminergic medication used and levodopa equivalent daily dose at baseline in the Long-Term Study-1. Chi-square statistic and linear regression models were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of use of different types of dopaminergic medications at baseline between men and women with Parkinson Disease. A small but statistically significant difference was observed in the median unadjusted levodopa equivalent daily dose at baseline between women (300 mg) and men (325 mg), but this was not observed after controlling for disease duration (years since Parkinson disease diagnosis), disease severity (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Motor and Activities of Daily Living Scores), and body weight. Conclusions: In this large multicenter study, we did not observe sex differences in the type and dose of dopaminergic medications used in early Parkinson Disease. Further research is needed to evaluate the influence of male or female sex on use of dopaminergic medication in mid- and late-stage Parkinson Disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere112287
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 8 2014

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Parkinson disease
gender differences
Sex Characteristics
drug therapy
Multicenter Studies
Canada
Parkinson Disease
L-dopa
Levodopa
disease diagnosis
dosage
Linear Models
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
creatine
rating scales
nervous system diseases
Creatine
gender
Activities of Daily Living
stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

No sex differences in use of dopaminergic medication in early Parkinson disease in the US and Canada - Baseline findings of a multicenter trial. / Umeh, Chizoba C.; Pérez, Adriana; Augustine, Erika F.; Dhall, Rohit; Dewey, Richard B.; Mari, Zoltan; Simon, David K.; Wills, Anne Marie A; Christine, Chadwick W.; Schneider, Jay S.; Suchowersky, Oksana.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 12, e112287, 08.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Umeh, CC, Pérez, A, Augustine, EF, Dhall, R, Dewey, RB, Mari, Z, Simon, DK, Wills, AMA, Christine, CW, Schneider, JS & Suchowersky, O 2014, 'No sex differences in use of dopaminergic medication in early Parkinson disease in the US and Canada - Baseline findings of a multicenter trial', PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 12, e112287. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112287
Umeh, Chizoba C. ; Pérez, Adriana ; Augustine, Erika F. ; Dhall, Rohit ; Dewey, Richard B. ; Mari, Zoltan ; Simon, David K. ; Wills, Anne Marie A ; Christine, Chadwick W. ; Schneider, Jay S. ; Suchowersky, Oksana. / No sex differences in use of dopaminergic medication in early Parkinson disease in the US and Canada - Baseline findings of a multicenter trial. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 12.
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AU - Dhall, Rohit

AU - Dewey, Richard B.

AU - Mari, Zoltan

AU - Simon, David K.

AU - Wills, Anne Marie A

AU - Christine, Chadwick W.

AU - Schneider, Jay S.

AU - Suchowersky, Oksana

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