No small matter: Pediatric resuscitation

Taylor McCormick, Kevin McVaney, Paul E. Pepe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review To present advancements in pediatric cardiac arrest research, highlighting articles most relevant to clinical practice published since the latest international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent findings Clinical trials examining targeted temperature management in children support avoidance of hyperthermia for both pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest (PIHCA) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (POHCA), but no statistically significant outcome differences were confirmed comparing 33 and 36 8C in the limited populations studied. Retrospective analyses of population-based POHCA registries revealed several associations: both bystander CPR and public-access defibrillation were associated with improved POHCA outcomes; conflicting results overshadow the benefits of conventional versus compression-only CPR; extracorporeal CPR was associated with improved PIHCA outcomes regardless of cause; intubation in PIHCA was associated with decreased survival, whereas there were no significant differences in outcomes between advanced airway management and bag-valve-mask ventilation in POHCA; and early epinephrine delivery in nonshockable rhythms during PIHCA was associated with improved outcomes. Length, age, and weight-based dosing systems can reduce time to medication delivery, quantitative errors, and anxiety among care providers. Summary Mounting evidence continues to align management priorities for resuscitation of children and adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-198
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Critical Care
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Heart Arrest
Pediatric Hospitals
Resuscitation
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Pediatrics
Airway Management
Masks
Intubation
Population
Epinephrine
Registries
Fever
Anxiety
Clinical Trials
Guidelines
Weights and Measures
Temperature
Research
polyisohexylcyanoacrylate

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Pediatric
  • Resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

No small matter : Pediatric resuscitation. / McCormick, Taylor; McVaney, Kevin; Pepe, Paul E.

In: Current Opinion in Critical Care, Vol. 23, No. 3, 2017, p. 193-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

McCormick, Taylor ; McVaney, Kevin ; Pepe, Paul E. / No small matter : Pediatric resuscitation. In: Current Opinion in Critical Care. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 193-198.
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