Novel application of thoracic impedance to characterize ventilations during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the pragmatic airway resuscitation trial

Michelle M.J. Nassal, Xabier Jaureguibeitia, Elisabete Aramendi, Unai Irusta, Ashish R. Panchal, Henry E. Wang, Ahamed Idris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Significant challenges exist in measuring ventilation quality during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCA) outcomes. Since ventilation is associated with outcomes in cardiac arrest, tools that objectively describe ventilation dynamics are needed. We sought to characterize thoracic impedance (TI) oscillations associated with ventilation waveforms in the Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART). Methods: We analyzed CPR process files collected from adult OHCA enrolled in PART. We limited the analysis to cases with simultaneous capnography ventilation recordings at the Dallas-Fort Worth site. We identified ventilation waveforms in the thoracic impedance signal by applying automated signal processing with adaptive filtering techniques to remove overlying artifacts from chest compressions. We correlated detected ventilations with the end-tidal capnography signals. We determined the amplitudes (Ai, Ae) and durations (Di, De) of both insufflation and exhalation phases. We compared differences between laryngeal tube (LT) and endotracheal intubation (ETI) airway management during mechanical or manual chest compressions using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: We included 303 CPR process cases in the analysis; 209 manual (77 ETI, 132 LT), 94 mechanical (41 ETI, 53 LT). Ventilation Ai and Ae were higher for ETI than LT in both manual (ETI: Ai 0.71 Ω, Ae 0.70 Ω vs LT: Ai 0.46 Ω, Ae 0.45 Ω; p < 0.01 respectively) and mechanical chest compressions (ETI: Ai 1.22 Ω, Ae 1.14 Ω VS LT: Ai 0.74 Ω, Ae 0.68 Ω; p < 0.01 respectively). Ventilations per minute, duration of TI amplitude insufflation and exhalation did not differ among groups. Conclusion: Compared with LT, ETI thoracic impedance ventilation insufflation and exhalation amplitude were higher while duration did not differ. TI may provide a novel approach to characterizing ventilation during OHCA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages7
JournalResuscitation
Volume168
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • Resuscitation
  • Thoracic impedance
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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