Nuclear receptors and breast cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until recently, the study of nuclear receptor (NR) function in breast cancer biology has been largely limited to estrogen and progesterone receptors. The development of reliable gene expression arrays, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques for studying NR superfamily members in primary human breast cancers has now revealed the presence and potential importance of several additional NRs in the biology of breast cancer. These include receptors for steroid hormones (including androgens and corticosteroids), fat-soluble vitamins A and D, fatty acids, and xenobiotic lipids derived from diet. It is now clear that after NR activation, both genomic and non-genomic NR pathways can coordinately activate growth factor signaling pathways. Advances in our understanding of both NR functional networks and epithelial cell growth factor signaling pathways have revealed a frequent interplay between NR and epithelial cell growth factor family signaling that is clinically relevant to breast cancer. Understanding how growth factor receptors and their downstream kinases are activated by NRs (and vice-versa) is a central goal for maximizing treatment opportunities in breast cancer. In addition to the estrogen receptor, it is predicted that modulating the activity of other NRs will soon provide novel prevention and treatment approaches for breast cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2215-2228
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular Endocrinology
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Breast Neoplasms
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Estrogen Receptors
Epithelial Cells
Growth Factor Receptors
Steroid Receptors
Xenobiotics
Progesterone Receptors
Vitamin A
Vitamin D
Androgens
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Phosphotransferases
Fatty Acids
Fats
Hormones
Diet
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Nuclear receptors and breast cancer. / Conzen, Suzanne D.

In: Molecular Endocrinology, Vol. 22, No. 10, 01.10.2008, p. 2215-2228.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

@article{682ad1d1050b4a63b51b200628449224,
title = "Nuclear receptors and breast cancer",
abstract = "Until recently, the study of nuclear receptor (NR) function in breast cancer biology has been largely limited to estrogen and progesterone receptors. The development of reliable gene expression arrays, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques for studying NR superfamily members in primary human breast cancers has now revealed the presence and potential importance of several additional NRs in the biology of breast cancer. These include receptors for steroid hormones (including androgens and corticosteroids), fat-soluble vitamins A and D, fatty acids, and xenobiotic lipids derived from diet. It is now clear that after NR activation, both genomic and non-genomic NR pathways can coordinately activate growth factor signaling pathways. Advances in our understanding of both NR functional networks and epithelial cell growth factor signaling pathways have revealed a frequent interplay between NR and epithelial cell growth factor family signaling that is clinically relevant to breast cancer. Understanding how growth factor receptors and their downstream kinases are activated by NRs (and vice-versa) is a central goal for maximizing treatment opportunities in breast cancer. In addition to the estrogen receptor, it is predicted that modulating the activity of other NRs will soon provide novel prevention and treatment approaches for breast cancer patients.",
author = "Conzen, {Suzanne D.}",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/me.2007-0421",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "2215--2228",
journal = "Molecular Endocrinology",
issn = "0888-8809",
publisher = "The Endocrine Society",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nuclear receptors and breast cancer

AU - Conzen, Suzanne D.

PY - 2008/10/1

Y1 - 2008/10/1

N2 - Until recently, the study of nuclear receptor (NR) function in breast cancer biology has been largely limited to estrogen and progesterone receptors. The development of reliable gene expression arrays, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques for studying NR superfamily members in primary human breast cancers has now revealed the presence and potential importance of several additional NRs in the biology of breast cancer. These include receptors for steroid hormones (including androgens and corticosteroids), fat-soluble vitamins A and D, fatty acids, and xenobiotic lipids derived from diet. It is now clear that after NR activation, both genomic and non-genomic NR pathways can coordinately activate growth factor signaling pathways. Advances in our understanding of both NR functional networks and epithelial cell growth factor signaling pathways have revealed a frequent interplay between NR and epithelial cell growth factor family signaling that is clinically relevant to breast cancer. Understanding how growth factor receptors and their downstream kinases are activated by NRs (and vice-versa) is a central goal for maximizing treatment opportunities in breast cancer. In addition to the estrogen receptor, it is predicted that modulating the activity of other NRs will soon provide novel prevention and treatment approaches for breast cancer patients.

AB - Until recently, the study of nuclear receptor (NR) function in breast cancer biology has been largely limited to estrogen and progesterone receptors. The development of reliable gene expression arrays, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques for studying NR superfamily members in primary human breast cancers has now revealed the presence and potential importance of several additional NRs in the biology of breast cancer. These include receptors for steroid hormones (including androgens and corticosteroids), fat-soluble vitamins A and D, fatty acids, and xenobiotic lipids derived from diet. It is now clear that after NR activation, both genomic and non-genomic NR pathways can coordinately activate growth factor signaling pathways. Advances in our understanding of both NR functional networks and epithelial cell growth factor signaling pathways have revealed a frequent interplay between NR and epithelial cell growth factor family signaling that is clinically relevant to breast cancer. Understanding how growth factor receptors and their downstream kinases are activated by NRs (and vice-versa) is a central goal for maximizing treatment opportunities in breast cancer. In addition to the estrogen receptor, it is predicted that modulating the activity of other NRs will soon provide novel prevention and treatment approaches for breast cancer patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=52949111533&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=52949111533&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/me.2007-0421

DO - 10.1210/me.2007-0421

M3 - Short survey

C2 - 18417735

AN - SCOPUS:52949111533

VL - 22

SP - 2215

EP - 2228

JO - Molecular Endocrinology

JF - Molecular Endocrinology

SN - 0888-8809

IS - 10

ER -