Nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia

Jo Ann S Carson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

National guidelines indicate patients with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol should consume less than 7% of calories from saturated fat and less than 200 mg of cholesterol. Trans fatty acids should also be limited. Incorporation of functional foods, such as stanol-containing margarine, soy products, and soluble fiber-rich cereals and vegetables can provide further benefit. In addition to weight loss and physical activity, individuals with hypertriglyceridemia benefit from a diet moderate in fat and carbohydrate rather than a low-fat diet. Including monounsaturated or omega-3 fatty acids lowers serum triglycerides. Many of the dietary strategies to optimize serum lipids also contribute to glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-403
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume3
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2003

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Nutrition Therapy
Dyslipidemias
Fats
Margarine
Trans Fatty Acids
Fat-Restricted Diet
Functional Food
Hypertriglyceridemia
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Serum
Vegetables
LDL Cholesterol
Weight Loss
Diabetes Mellitus
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Carbohydrates
Guidelines
Exercise
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Carson, J. A. S. (2003). Nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia. Current Diabetes Reports, 3(5), 397-403.

Nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia. / Carson, Jo Ann S.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 3, No. 5, 10.2003, p. 397-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carson, JAS 2003, 'Nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia', Current Diabetes Reports, vol. 3, no. 5, pp. 397-403.
Carson, Jo Ann S. / Nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia. In: Current Diabetes Reports. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 5. pp. 397-403.
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