Optimizing Antibiotic Dosing Strategies for the Treatment of Gram-negative Infections in the Era of Resistance

Marguerite L. Monogue, Joseph L. Kuti, David P. Nicolau

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gram-negative organisms are an increasing source of concern within the healthcare setting due to their common presence as a cause of infection and emerging resistance to current therapies. However, current antimicrobial dosing recommendations may be insufficient for the treatment of gram-negative infections. Applying knowledge of an antibiotics pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile when designing a dosing regimen leads to a greater likelihood of achieving optimal exposure, including against gram-negative pathogens with higher MICs. Additionally, administering antibiotics directly to the site of infection, such as via aerosolization for pneumonia, is another method to achieve optimized drug exposure at the site of infection. Incorporating these treatment strategies into clinical practice will assist antimicrobial stewardship programs in successfully treating gram-negative infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-476
Number of pages18
JournalExpert Review of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aerosolized antibiotics
  • Gram-negative bacteria
  • pharmacodynamics
  • pharmacokinetics
  • resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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