Options for outpatient management of serious infections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As costs of hospitalization have soared at rates greater than those of other economic indices there has been increasing pressure on physicians to find innovative ways to decrease the duration of hospital stay of their patients. In the case of many serious illnesses the initial period of intensive care or extensive use of hospital procedures or facilities is relatively short. This is followed by a period of many days or weeks during which continued therapy and monitoring of progress requires minimal nursing, laboratory and physician effort. For example the typical child with staphylococcal pneumonia and pleural empyema has been stabilized and pleural drainage tubes have been removed after 5 to 7 days of therapy, yet the child remains hospitalized for 4 to 6 weeks in order to receive parenteral medication three or four times daily. Finding alternative ways to treat such a child out of hospital is the challenge to the physician. There are several options for outpatient management of serious infections: daily visits by the patient to an office or clinic for parenteral medication; parenteral administration of drugs in the home by either home health care professionals or by the patient or a family member; oral antibiotic therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-606
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume6
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1987

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Outpatients
Physicians
Infection
Staphylococcal Pneumonia
Pleural Empyema
Hospitalized Child
Critical Care
Home Care Services
Drainage
Length of Stay
Hospitalization
Nursing
Therapeutics
Economics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Delivery of Health Care
Pressure
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Options for outpatient management of serious infections. / Nelson, J. D.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 6, No. 6, 1987, p. 603-606.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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