Outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage from a very small aneurysm: A case-control series

Christopher L. Taylor, Debra Steele, Thomas A. Kopitnik, Duke S. Samson, Phillip D. Purdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. A case-control analysis of patients with SAH was performed to compare risk factors and outcomes at 6 months posthemorrhage in patients with a very small aneurysm compared with those with a larger aneurysm. Methods. All patients with SAH who were treated between January 1998 and December 1999 were studied. A very small aneurysm was defined as "equal to or less than 5 mm in diameter." Clinical data and treatment summaries were maintained in an electronic database. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score was determined by an independent registrar. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated. A very small aneurysm was the cause of SAH in 42 patients (33%), whereas 85 (67%) had aneurysms larger than 5 mm (mean diameter 11 mm). There were no differences in demographic variables or medical comorbidities between the two groups. Thick SAH (Fisher Grade 3 or 4) was more common in patients with a very small aneurysm than in those with a larger aneurysm (p = 0.028). One hundred eight patients underwent microsurgery (85%), 15 underwent coil embolization (12%), and four (3%) required both procedures. Vasospasm occurred in nine patients (21%) with very small aneurysms compared with 14 (16%) with larger aneurysms (p = 0.62). Shunt-dependent hydrocephalus occurred in nine patients (21%) with very small aneurysms and in 19 (22%) with larger aneurysms (p = 1). The mean GOS score for both groups was 4 (moderately disabled) at 6 months. Conclusions. Small aneurysms produce thick SAH more often than larger aneurysms. There is no difference in outcome after SAH between patients with a very small aneurysm and those with a larger aneurysm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-625
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume100
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 2004

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Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Aneurysm
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Microsurgery
Hydrocephalus
Comorbidity

Keywords

  • Aneurysm
  • Endovascular surgery
  • Microsurgery
  • Outcome
  • Risk factor
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Taylor, C. L., Steele, D., Kopitnik, T. A., Samson, D. S., & Purdy, P. D. (2004). Outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage from a very small aneurysm: A case-control series. Journal of Neurosurgery, 100(4), 623-625.

Outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage from a very small aneurysm : A case-control series. / Taylor, Christopher L.; Steele, Debra; Kopitnik, Thomas A.; Samson, Duke S.; Purdy, Phillip D.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 100, No. 4, 04.2004, p. 623-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, CL, Steele, D, Kopitnik, TA, Samson, DS & Purdy, PD 2004, 'Outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage from a very small aneurysm: A case-control series', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 100, no. 4, pp. 623-625.
Taylor CL, Steele D, Kopitnik TA, Samson DS, Purdy PD. Outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage from a very small aneurysm: A case-control series. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2004 Apr;100(4):623-625.
Taylor, Christopher L. ; Steele, Debra ; Kopitnik, Thomas A. ; Samson, Duke S. ; Purdy, Phillip D. / Outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage from a very small aneurysm : A case-control series. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2004 ; Vol. 100, No. 4. pp. 623-625.
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AU - Purdy, Phillip D.

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N2 - Object. A case-control analysis of patients with SAH was performed to compare risk factors and outcomes at 6 months posthemorrhage in patients with a very small aneurysm compared with those with a larger aneurysm. Methods. All patients with SAH who were treated between January 1998 and December 1999 were studied. A very small aneurysm was defined as "equal to or less than 5 mm in diameter." Clinical data and treatment summaries were maintained in an electronic database. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score was determined by an independent registrar. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated. A very small aneurysm was the cause of SAH in 42 patients (33%), whereas 85 (67%) had aneurysms larger than 5 mm (mean diameter 11 mm). There were no differences in demographic variables or medical comorbidities between the two groups. Thick SAH (Fisher Grade 3 or 4) was more common in patients with a very small aneurysm than in those with a larger aneurysm (p = 0.028). One hundred eight patients underwent microsurgery (85%), 15 underwent coil embolization (12%), and four (3%) required both procedures. Vasospasm occurred in nine patients (21%) with very small aneurysms compared with 14 (16%) with larger aneurysms (p = 0.62). Shunt-dependent hydrocephalus occurred in nine patients (21%) with very small aneurysms and in 19 (22%) with larger aneurysms (p = 1). The mean GOS score for both groups was 4 (moderately disabled) at 6 months. Conclusions. Small aneurysms produce thick SAH more often than larger aneurysms. There is no difference in outcome after SAH between patients with a very small aneurysm and those with a larger aneurysm.

AB - Object. A case-control analysis of patients with SAH was performed to compare risk factors and outcomes at 6 months posthemorrhage in patients with a very small aneurysm compared with those with a larger aneurysm. Methods. All patients with SAH who were treated between January 1998 and December 1999 were studied. A very small aneurysm was defined as "equal to or less than 5 mm in diameter." Clinical data and treatment summaries were maintained in an electronic database. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score was determined by an independent registrar. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated. A very small aneurysm was the cause of SAH in 42 patients (33%), whereas 85 (67%) had aneurysms larger than 5 mm (mean diameter 11 mm). There were no differences in demographic variables or medical comorbidities between the two groups. Thick SAH (Fisher Grade 3 or 4) was more common in patients with a very small aneurysm than in those with a larger aneurysm (p = 0.028). One hundred eight patients underwent microsurgery (85%), 15 underwent coil embolization (12%), and four (3%) required both procedures. Vasospasm occurred in nine patients (21%) with very small aneurysms compared with 14 (16%) with larger aneurysms (p = 0.62). Shunt-dependent hydrocephalus occurred in nine patients (21%) with very small aneurysms and in 19 (22%) with larger aneurysms (p = 1). The mean GOS score for both groups was 4 (moderately disabled) at 6 months. Conclusions. Small aneurysms produce thick SAH more often than larger aneurysms. There is no difference in outcome after SAH between patients with a very small aneurysm and those with a larger aneurysm.

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