Pairing virtual reality with dynamic posturography serves to differentiate patients with visual vertigo

Emily A. Keshner, Jefferson Streepey, Yasin Dhaher, Timothy C. Hain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To determine if increased visual dependence can be quantified through its impact on automatic postural responses, we have measured the combined effect of transient optic flow in the pitch plane with platform rotations and translations on the latencies and magnitudes of postural response kinematics. Six healthy (29-31 yrs) and 4 visually sensitive (27-57 yrs) subjects stood on a platform that was rotated (6 deg of dorsiflexion at 30 deg/sec) or translated (5 cm at 5 deg/sec) for 200 ms. Subjects either had eyes closed or viewed an immersive, stereo, wide field of view virtual environment (scene) that moved in upward pitch at 5 velocities for a 200 ms period. Three 30 sec trials were presented for each visual condition. Kinematics were collected with a Motion Analysis system and angular displacement of head, trunk, and head with respect to trunk were calculated. EMG responses of 6 trunk and lower limb muscles were collected and latencies and magnitudes of responses determined for each trial. No effect of visual velocity was observed in the EMG response latencies and magnitudes. Large effects of visual field velocity were observed on the magnitudes of head angular displacement in each of the visually sensitive subjects with unique characteristics that can be related to their particular clinical history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006
Pages178-181
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event5th International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 29 2006Aug 30 2006

Publication series

NameFifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006

Conference

Conference5th International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period8/29/068/30/06

Fingerprint

Vertigo
Virtual reality
Head
Biomechanical Phenomena
Reaction Time
Kinematics
Optic Flow
Visual Fields
Muscle
Lower Extremity
Optics
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Software
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Keshner, E. A., Streepey, J., Dhaher, Y., & Hain, T. C. (2006). Pairing virtual reality with dynamic posturography serves to differentiate patients with visual vertigo. In Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006 (pp. 178-181). [1707549] (Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006).

Pairing virtual reality with dynamic posturography serves to differentiate patients with visual vertigo. / Keshner, Emily A.; Streepey, Jefferson; Dhaher, Yasin; Hain, Timothy C.

Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006. 2006. p. 178-181 1707549 (Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Keshner, EA, Streepey, J, Dhaher, Y & Hain, TC 2006, Pairing virtual reality with dynamic posturography serves to differentiate patients with visual vertigo. in Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006., 1707549, Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006, pp. 178-181, 5th International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006, New York, NY, United States, 8/29/06.
Keshner EA, Streepey J, Dhaher Y, Hain TC. Pairing virtual reality with dynamic posturography serves to differentiate patients with visual vertigo. In Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006. 2006. p. 178-181. 1707549. (Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006).
Keshner, Emily A. ; Streepey, Jefferson ; Dhaher, Yasin ; Hain, Timothy C. / Pairing virtual reality with dynamic posturography serves to differentiate patients with visual vertigo. Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006. 2006. pp. 178-181 (Fifth International Workshop on Virtual Rehabilitation, IWVR 2006).
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