Pancreatic Alpha-Cell Function in Trauma

A. Lindsey, Fausto Santeusanio, Jan Braaten, Gerald R. Faloona, Roger H Unger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a group of 20 consecutive patients hospitalized with severe traumatic shock, mean plasma glucagon levels averaged 328±65μμg/ml, significantly above the normal fasting levels. Insulin concentration was normal, and plasma glucose levels averaged 188 (±14) mg/100 ml, significantly above normal. Insulin-glucagon molar ratio was low in 17 of the 20 patients. In three patients undergoing major surgery without associated hypotension, glucagon concentrations did not rise comparably. Hyperglucagonemia without a proportional rise in insulin may be the usual islet cell response to severe trauma and possibly could contribute to survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)757-761
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume227
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 1974

Fingerprint

Glucagon-Secreting Cells
Glucagon
Insulin
Wounds and Injuries
Traumatic Shock
Islets of Langerhans
Hypotension
Fasting
Glucose
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pancreatic Alpha-Cell Function in Trauma. / Lindsey, A.; Santeusanio, Fausto; Braaten, Jan; Faloona, Gerald R.; Unger, Roger H.

In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 227, No. 7, 18.02.1974, p. 757-761.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindsey, A. ; Santeusanio, Fausto ; Braaten, Jan ; Faloona, Gerald R. ; Unger, Roger H. / Pancreatic Alpha-Cell Function in Trauma. In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. 1974 ; Vol. 227, No. 7. pp. 757-761.
@article{8bf8df72ccea4396a2f5ba0190bfb588,
title = "Pancreatic Alpha-Cell Function in Trauma",
abstract = "In a group of 20 consecutive patients hospitalized with severe traumatic shock, mean plasma glucagon levels averaged 328±65μμg/ml, significantly above the normal fasting levels. Insulin concentration was normal, and plasma glucose levels averaged 188 (±14) mg/100 ml, significantly above normal. Insulin-glucagon molar ratio was low in 17 of the 20 patients. In three patients undergoing major surgery without associated hypotension, glucagon concentrations did not rise comparably. Hyperglucagonemia without a proportional rise in insulin may be the usual islet cell response to severe trauma and possibly could contribute to survival.",
author = "A. Lindsey and Fausto Santeusanio and Jan Braaten and Faloona, {Gerald R.} and Unger, {Roger H}",
year = "1974",
month = "2",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1001/jama.1974.03230200015003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "227",
pages = "757--761",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0098-7484",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pancreatic Alpha-Cell Function in Trauma

AU - Lindsey, A.

AU - Santeusanio, Fausto

AU - Braaten, Jan

AU - Faloona, Gerald R.

AU - Unger, Roger H

PY - 1974/2/18

Y1 - 1974/2/18

N2 - In a group of 20 consecutive patients hospitalized with severe traumatic shock, mean plasma glucagon levels averaged 328±65μμg/ml, significantly above the normal fasting levels. Insulin concentration was normal, and plasma glucose levels averaged 188 (±14) mg/100 ml, significantly above normal. Insulin-glucagon molar ratio was low in 17 of the 20 patients. In three patients undergoing major surgery without associated hypotension, glucagon concentrations did not rise comparably. Hyperglucagonemia without a proportional rise in insulin may be the usual islet cell response to severe trauma and possibly could contribute to survival.

AB - In a group of 20 consecutive patients hospitalized with severe traumatic shock, mean plasma glucagon levels averaged 328±65μμg/ml, significantly above the normal fasting levels. Insulin concentration was normal, and plasma glucose levels averaged 188 (±14) mg/100 ml, significantly above normal. Insulin-glucagon molar ratio was low in 17 of the 20 patients. In three patients undergoing major surgery without associated hypotension, glucagon concentrations did not rise comparably. Hyperglucagonemia without a proportional rise in insulin may be the usual islet cell response to severe trauma and possibly could contribute to survival.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947510314&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947510314&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jama.1974.03230200015003

DO - 10.1001/jama.1974.03230200015003

M3 - Article

C2 - 4590022

AN - SCOPUS:84947510314

VL - 227

SP - 757

EP - 761

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0098-7484

IS - 7

ER -