Parental beliefs about nocturnal enuresis causes, treatments, and the need to seek professional medical care

Bruce Schlomer, Esequiel Rodriguez, Dana Weiss, Hillary Copp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To better understand parental beliefs regarding the etiology and treatment of nocturnal enuresis (NE). Methods A self-administered survey queried parental NE beliefs including perceived etiologies and home behavioral treatments. We assessed for associations between demographic characteristics and propensity to seek medical care for NE. Results Of 216 respondents, 78% were female. The most common causes for NE reported were: deep sleeper (56%), unknown (39%), and laziness (26%). Popular home behavioral therapies included: void prior to sleep (77%) and limiting fluid intake at night (71%). Few reported they would use a bedwetting alarm (6%). Fifty-five percent reported they would seek medical care for NE and 28% reported awareness of effective treatments. On multivariable analysis, females (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.04-5.0) and those with graduate level education (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.5-15.7) were more likely to seek medical care for their child with NE. Conclusions General parental knowledge of the causes and effective treatments for NE is lacking. Only 55% reported they would seek medical care for their child with NE and only 28% reported awareness of effective treatments. Counseling should focus on dispelling common misconceptions about causes and treatments of NE and focus on proven effective treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1043-1048
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Urology
Volume9
Issue number6 PART B
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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Nocturnal Enuresis
Therapeutics
Child Care
Graduate Education
Counseling
Sleep
Demography

Keywords

  • Bedwetting alarm
  • Nocturnal enuresis
  • Parental survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Parental beliefs about nocturnal enuresis causes, treatments, and the need to seek professional medical care. / Schlomer, Bruce; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana; Copp, Hillary.

In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, Vol. 9, No. 6 PART B, 12.2013, p. 1043-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schlomer, Bruce ; Rodriguez, Esequiel ; Weiss, Dana ; Copp, Hillary. / Parental beliefs about nocturnal enuresis causes, treatments, and the need to seek professional medical care. In: Journal of Pediatric Urology. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 6 PART B. pp. 1043-1048.
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