Parity and breastfeeding among African-American women: Differential effects on breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status in the Women's Circle of Health Study

Christine B. Ambrosone, Gary Zirpoli, Melanie Ruszczyk, Jyoti Shankar, Chi Chen Hong, Demetra McIlwain, Michelle Roberts, Song Yao, Susan E. McCann, Gregory Ciupak, Helena Hwang, Thaer Khoury, Lina Jandorf, Dana H. Bovbjerg, Karen Pawlish, Elisa V. Bandera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: It has long been held that parity reduces risk of breast cancer. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of parity, as well as breastfeeding, may vary according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. We evaluated these associations in a case-control study among African-American women in New York City and New Jersey. Methods: In the Women's Circle of Health Study, including 786 African-American women with breast cancer and 1,015 controls, data on reproductive histories were collected from in-person interviews, with tumor characteristics abstracted from pathology reports. We calculated number of live births and months breastfeeding for each child, and examined each in relation to breast cancer by ER status, and for triple-negative (TN) breast cancer. Results: Although associations were not statistically significant, having children was associated with reduced risk of ER+ breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.82, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.58-1.16], but increased risk of ER- tumors, with associations most pronounced for TN breast cancer (OR 1.81, 95 % CI 0.93-3.51). Breastfeeding gave no additional benefit for ER+ cancer, but reduced the risk of ER- disease associated with parity. Conclusions: Accumulating data from a number of studies, as well as our own in African-American women, indicate that the effects of parity and breastfeeding differ by ER status. African-American women are more likely to have children and not to breastfeed, and to have ER- and TN breast cancer. It is possible that breastfeeding in this population could reduce risk of more aggressive breast cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-265
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

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Women's Health
Parity
Breast Feeding
Estrogen Receptors
African Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Reproductive History
Live Birth
Case-Control Studies
Interviews
Pathology
Population

Keywords

  • African-American, estrogen receptor negative
  • Breast cancer
  • Breastfeeding
  • Parity
  • Triple-negative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Parity and breastfeeding among African-American women : Differential effects on breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status in the Women's Circle of Health Study. / Ambrosone, Christine B.; Zirpoli, Gary; Ruszczyk, Melanie; Shankar, Jyoti; Hong, Chi Chen; McIlwain, Demetra; Roberts, Michelle; Yao, Song; McCann, Susan E.; Ciupak, Gregory; Hwang, Helena; Khoury, Thaer; Jandorf, Lina; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Pawlish, Karen; Bandera, Elisa V.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 25, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 259-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ambrosone, CB, Zirpoli, G, Ruszczyk, M, Shankar, J, Hong, CC, McIlwain, D, Roberts, M, Yao, S, McCann, SE, Ciupak, G, Hwang, H, Khoury, T, Jandorf, L, Bovbjerg, DH, Pawlish, K & Bandera, EV 2014, 'Parity and breastfeeding among African-American women: Differential effects on breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status in the Women's Circle of Health Study', Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 259-265. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-013-0323-9
Ambrosone, Christine B. ; Zirpoli, Gary ; Ruszczyk, Melanie ; Shankar, Jyoti ; Hong, Chi Chen ; McIlwain, Demetra ; Roberts, Michelle ; Yao, Song ; McCann, Susan E. ; Ciupak, Gregory ; Hwang, Helena ; Khoury, Thaer ; Jandorf, Lina ; Bovbjerg, Dana H. ; Pawlish, Karen ; Bandera, Elisa V. / Parity and breastfeeding among African-American women : Differential effects on breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status in the Women's Circle of Health Study. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 259-265.
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abstract = "Purpose: It has long been held that parity reduces risk of breast cancer. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of parity, as well as breastfeeding, may vary according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. We evaluated these associations in a case-control study among African-American women in New York City and New Jersey. Methods: In the Women's Circle of Health Study, including 786 African-American women with breast cancer and 1,015 controls, data on reproductive histories were collected from in-person interviews, with tumor characteristics abstracted from pathology reports. We calculated number of live births and months breastfeeding for each child, and examined each in relation to breast cancer by ER status, and for triple-negative (TN) breast cancer. Results: Although associations were not statistically significant, having children was associated with reduced risk of ER+ breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.82, 95 {\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.58-1.16], but increased risk of ER- tumors, with associations most pronounced for TN breast cancer (OR 1.81, 95 {\%} CI 0.93-3.51). Breastfeeding gave no additional benefit for ER+ cancer, but reduced the risk of ER- disease associated with parity. Conclusions: Accumulating data from a number of studies, as well as our own in African-American women, indicate that the effects of parity and breastfeeding differ by ER status. African-American women are more likely to have children and not to breastfeed, and to have ER- and TN breast cancer. It is possible that breastfeeding in this population could reduce risk of more aggressive breast cancers.",
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AU - Zirpoli, Gary

AU - Ruszczyk, Melanie

AU - Shankar, Jyoti

AU - Hong, Chi Chen

AU - McIlwain, Demetra

AU - Roberts, Michelle

AU - Yao, Song

AU - McCann, Susan E.

AU - Ciupak, Gregory

AU - Hwang, Helena

AU - Khoury, Thaer

AU - Jandorf, Lina

AU - Bovbjerg, Dana H.

AU - Pawlish, Karen

AU - Bandera, Elisa V.

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N2 - Purpose: It has long been held that parity reduces risk of breast cancer. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of parity, as well as breastfeeding, may vary according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. We evaluated these associations in a case-control study among African-American women in New York City and New Jersey. Methods: In the Women's Circle of Health Study, including 786 African-American women with breast cancer and 1,015 controls, data on reproductive histories were collected from in-person interviews, with tumor characteristics abstracted from pathology reports. We calculated number of live births and months breastfeeding for each child, and examined each in relation to breast cancer by ER status, and for triple-negative (TN) breast cancer. Results: Although associations were not statistically significant, having children was associated with reduced risk of ER+ breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.82, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.58-1.16], but increased risk of ER- tumors, with associations most pronounced for TN breast cancer (OR 1.81, 95 % CI 0.93-3.51). Breastfeeding gave no additional benefit for ER+ cancer, but reduced the risk of ER- disease associated with parity. Conclusions: Accumulating data from a number of studies, as well as our own in African-American women, indicate that the effects of parity and breastfeeding differ by ER status. African-American women are more likely to have children and not to breastfeed, and to have ER- and TN breast cancer. It is possible that breastfeeding in this population could reduce risk of more aggressive breast cancers.

AB - Purpose: It has long been held that parity reduces risk of breast cancer. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of parity, as well as breastfeeding, may vary according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. We evaluated these associations in a case-control study among African-American women in New York City and New Jersey. Methods: In the Women's Circle of Health Study, including 786 African-American women with breast cancer and 1,015 controls, data on reproductive histories were collected from in-person interviews, with tumor characteristics abstracted from pathology reports. We calculated number of live births and months breastfeeding for each child, and examined each in relation to breast cancer by ER status, and for triple-negative (TN) breast cancer. Results: Although associations were not statistically significant, having children was associated with reduced risk of ER+ breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.82, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.58-1.16], but increased risk of ER- tumors, with associations most pronounced for TN breast cancer (OR 1.81, 95 % CI 0.93-3.51). Breastfeeding gave no additional benefit for ER+ cancer, but reduced the risk of ER- disease associated with parity. Conclusions: Accumulating data from a number of studies, as well as our own in African-American women, indicate that the effects of parity and breastfeeding differ by ER status. African-American women are more likely to have children and not to breastfeed, and to have ER- and TN breast cancer. It is possible that breastfeeding in this population could reduce risk of more aggressive breast cancers.

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KW - Breastfeeding

KW - Parity

KW - Triple-negative

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