Parotid gland trauma

Eli A. Gordin, James J. Daniero, Howard Krein, Maurits S. Boon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parotid trauma can lead to both short and long-term complications such as bleeding, infection, facial nerve injury, sialocele, and salivary fistula, resulting in pain and disfigurement. Facial injuries inferior to a line extended from the tragus to the upper lip should raise concern for parotid injury. These injuries can be stratified into three regions as they relate to the masseter muscle. Injuries posing the greatest risk of damage to Stensen's duct include those anterior to the posterior border of the masseter and necessitate exploration. When the duct is disrupted, emphasis should be placed on primary repair or re-creation of the papilla; however, proximal ductal lacerations can be treated by ligation of the proximal segment. Isolated parenchymal injury can be treated with more conservative means. Sialocele and salivary fistula can frequently be managed nonoperatively with antibiotics, pressure dressings, and serial aspiration. Anticholinergic medications and the injection of botulinum toxin represent additional measures before resorting to surgical therapies such as tympanic neurectomy or parotidectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-510
Number of pages7
JournalFacial Plastic Surgery
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 29 2010

Fingerprint

Parotid Gland
Wounds and Injuries
Fistula
Facial Nerve Injuries
Facial Injuries
Salivary Ducts
Masseter Muscle
Botulinum Toxins
Lacerations
Cholinergic Antagonists
Bandages
Lip
Ligation
Hemorrhage
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pressure
Pain
Injections
Infection

Keywords

  • complications
  • Parotid gland
  • penetrating injuries
  • Stensen's duct injury
  • wounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Gordin, E. A., Daniero, J. J., Krein, H., & Boon, M. S. (2010). Parotid gland trauma. Facial Plastic Surgery, 26(6), 504-510. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1267725

Parotid gland trauma. / Gordin, Eli A.; Daniero, James J.; Krein, Howard; Boon, Maurits S.

In: Facial Plastic Surgery, Vol. 26, No. 6, 29.11.2010, p. 504-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gordin, EA, Daniero, JJ, Krein, H & Boon, MS 2010, 'Parotid gland trauma', Facial Plastic Surgery, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 504-510. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1267725
Gordin EA, Daniero JJ, Krein H, Boon MS. Parotid gland trauma. Facial Plastic Surgery. 2010 Nov 29;26(6):504-510. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1267725
Gordin, Eli A. ; Daniero, James J. ; Krein, Howard ; Boon, Maurits S. / Parotid gland trauma. In: Facial Plastic Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 504-510.
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