Patient-Centered Research into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research: Implementing the patient-driven research paradigm to aid decision making in stroke care

Ying Xian, Emily C. O'Brien, Gregg C. Fonarow, Daiwai M. Olson, Lee H. Schwamm, Deidre Hannah, Brianna Lindholm, Lesley Maisch, Barbara L. Lytle, Melissa A. Greiner, Jingjing Wu, Eric D. Peterson, Michael J. Pencina, Adrian F. Hernandez

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Abstract

Background Stroke is common and costly, annually depriving the lives and well-being of 800,000 Americans. Despite demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials, questions remain about the safety and clinical effectiveness of various treatment options given patient characteristics, conditions, preferences, and their desired outcomes. Methods and results The Patient-Centered Research Into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research (PROSPER) is a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-sponsored project designed to help patients, physicians, and other stakeholders make informed decisions regarding stroke care and improve outcomes through patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. The primary outcomes identified and prioritized by stroke patients are "home time" (time spent alive and outside a hospital) and major adverse cardiovascular events. With inputs from stroke patients themselves, a series of comparative safety and effectiveness analyses will be performed across 3 prioritized therapeutic areas identified as important by stroke survivors: oral anticoagulants, statin therapy, and antidepressants. We obtained data from Get With the Guidelines-Stroke linked with Medicare claims and follow-up telephone interviews. Our combined retrospective and prospective research strategy allows the evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of various treatment options and patient-centered longitudinal outcomes. To ensure the rapid translation of findings into clinical practice, results will be disseminated to stroke survivors, caregivers, and health care providers through traditional and social media, including an online decision aid tool. Conclusions PROSPER is a patient-centered outcome research study guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community. By addressing knowledge gaps in treatment uncertainties through comparative effectiveness research, PROSPER has the potential to improve decision making in stroke care and patient outcomes reflecting individual patient preferences, needs, and values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-45.e11
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume170
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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