Patient-reported pediatric quality of life inventory 4.0 generic core scales in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders: Feasibility, reliability, and validity

Christine A. Limbers, Jane Ripperger-Suhler, Robert W. Heffer, James W. Varni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales as a patient self-reported health-related quality of life measurement instrument in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and physician-diagnosed comorbid psychiatric disorders being seen in a pediatric psychiatric clinic. The secondary objective was to evaluate parent proxy-reported PedsQL in this population. Methods: One hundred seventy-nine children with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders ages 5 to 18 years and 181 parents completed the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and parents also completed the Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Rating Scales. Known-groups discriminant validity comparisons were made between the sample of pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and healthy, cancer, and type 1 diabetes samples. Results: The PedsQL evidenced minimal missing responses for patient self-report and parent proxy-report (0.2% and 0.5%, respectively), demonstrated no significant floor or ceiling effects, and achieved excellent reliability for the Total Scale Score (α = 0.85 patient self-report, 0.92 parent proxy-report). Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported statistically significantly worse PedsQL scores than healthy children, with large effect sizes across all domains, supporting known-groups discriminant validity. Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported worse PedsQL scores compared to pediatric patients with cancer and diabetes with the exception of physical health, in which pediatric cancer patients manifested lower physical health, indicating the relative severe impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders. More severe ADHD symptoms were generally associated with more impaired PedsQL scores, supporting construct validity. Conclusions: These ata demonstrate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of patient self-reported PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in this high risk population of pediatric patients and highlight the profound negative impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders on generic health-related quality of life, comparable to or worse than serious pediatric chronic physical diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-530
Number of pages10
JournalValue in Health
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Reproducibility of Results
Psychiatry
Quality of Life
Pediatrics
Equipment and Supplies
Proxy
Parents
Self Report
Neoplasms
Health
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Population
Chronic Disease
Physicians

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Children
  • Comorbidity
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Patient reported outcomes
  • PedsQL

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Patient-reported pediatric quality of life inventory 4.0 generic core scales in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders : Feasibility, reliability, and validity. / Limbers, Christine A.; Ripperger-Suhler, Jane; Heffer, Robert W.; Varni, James W.

In: Value in Health, Vol. 14, No. 4, 06.2011, p. 521-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ca429a243c0542febd744ca6dc35538e,
title = "Patient-reported pediatric quality of life inventory™ 4.0 generic core scales in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders: Feasibility, reliability, and validity",
abstract = "Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales as a patient self-reported health-related quality of life measurement instrument in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and physician-diagnosed comorbid psychiatric disorders being seen in a pediatric psychiatric clinic. The secondary objective was to evaluate parent proxy-reported PedsQL in this population. Methods: One hundred seventy-nine children with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders ages 5 to 18 years and 181 parents completed the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and parents also completed the Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Rating Scales. Known-groups discriminant validity comparisons were made between the sample of pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and healthy, cancer, and type 1 diabetes samples. Results: The PedsQL evidenced minimal missing responses for patient self-report and parent proxy-report (0.2{\%} and 0.5{\%}, respectively), demonstrated no significant floor or ceiling effects, and achieved excellent reliability for the Total Scale Score (α = 0.85 patient self-report, 0.92 parent proxy-report). Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported statistically significantly worse PedsQL scores than healthy children, with large effect sizes across all domains, supporting known-groups discriminant validity. Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported worse PedsQL scores compared to pediatric patients with cancer and diabetes with the exception of physical health, in which pediatric cancer patients manifested lower physical health, indicating the relative severe impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders. More severe ADHD symptoms were generally associated with more impaired PedsQL scores, supporting construct validity. Conclusions: These ata demonstrate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of patient self-reported PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in this high risk population of pediatric patients and highlight the profound negative impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders on generic health-related quality of life, comparable to or worse than serious pediatric chronic physical diseases.",
keywords = "ADHD, Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Children, Comorbidity, Health-related quality of life, Patient reported outcomes, PedsQL",
author = "Limbers, {Christine A.} and Jane Ripperger-Suhler and Heffer, {Robert W.} and Varni, {James W.}",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.jval.2010.10.031",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "521--530",
journal = "Value in Health",
issn = "1098-3015",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient-reported pediatric quality of life inventory™ 4.0 generic core scales in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders

T2 - Feasibility, reliability, and validity

AU - Limbers, Christine A.

AU - Ripperger-Suhler, Jane

AU - Heffer, Robert W.

AU - Varni, James W.

PY - 2011/6

Y1 - 2011/6

N2 - Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales as a patient self-reported health-related quality of life measurement instrument in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and physician-diagnosed comorbid psychiatric disorders being seen in a pediatric psychiatric clinic. The secondary objective was to evaluate parent proxy-reported PedsQL in this population. Methods: One hundred seventy-nine children with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders ages 5 to 18 years and 181 parents completed the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and parents also completed the Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Rating Scales. Known-groups discriminant validity comparisons were made between the sample of pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and healthy, cancer, and type 1 diabetes samples. Results: The PedsQL evidenced minimal missing responses for patient self-report and parent proxy-report (0.2% and 0.5%, respectively), demonstrated no significant floor or ceiling effects, and achieved excellent reliability for the Total Scale Score (α = 0.85 patient self-report, 0.92 parent proxy-report). Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported statistically significantly worse PedsQL scores than healthy children, with large effect sizes across all domains, supporting known-groups discriminant validity. Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported worse PedsQL scores compared to pediatric patients with cancer and diabetes with the exception of physical health, in which pediatric cancer patients manifested lower physical health, indicating the relative severe impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders. More severe ADHD symptoms were generally associated with more impaired PedsQL scores, supporting construct validity. Conclusions: These ata demonstrate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of patient self-reported PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in this high risk population of pediatric patients and highlight the profound negative impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders on generic health-related quality of life, comparable to or worse than serious pediatric chronic physical diseases.

AB - Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales as a patient self-reported health-related quality of life measurement instrument in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and physician-diagnosed comorbid psychiatric disorders being seen in a pediatric psychiatric clinic. The secondary objective was to evaluate parent proxy-reported PedsQL in this population. Methods: One hundred seventy-nine children with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders ages 5 to 18 years and 181 parents completed the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and parents also completed the Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Rating Scales. Known-groups discriminant validity comparisons were made between the sample of pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and healthy, cancer, and type 1 diabetes samples. Results: The PedsQL evidenced minimal missing responses for patient self-report and parent proxy-report (0.2% and 0.5%, respectively), demonstrated no significant floor or ceiling effects, and achieved excellent reliability for the Total Scale Score (α = 0.85 patient self-report, 0.92 parent proxy-report). Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported statistically significantly worse PedsQL scores than healthy children, with large effect sizes across all domains, supporting known-groups discriminant validity. Pediatric patients with ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders and their parents reported worse PedsQL scores compared to pediatric patients with cancer and diabetes with the exception of physical health, in which pediatric cancer patients manifested lower physical health, indicating the relative severe impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders. More severe ADHD symptoms were generally associated with more impaired PedsQL scores, supporting construct validity. Conclusions: These ata demonstrate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of patient self-reported PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in this high risk population of pediatric patients and highlight the profound negative impact of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders on generic health-related quality of life, comparable to or worse than serious pediatric chronic physical diseases.

KW - ADHD

KW - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

KW - Children

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Health-related quality of life

KW - Patient reported outcomes

KW - PedsQL

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79959921761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79959921761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jval.2010.10.031

DO - 10.1016/j.jval.2010.10.031

M3 - Article

C2 - 21315637

AN - SCOPUS:79959921761

VL - 14

SP - 521

EP - 530

JO - Value in Health

JF - Value in Health

SN - 1098-3015

IS - 4

ER -