Patients and their family members prioritize post-transplant survival over waitlist survival when considering donor hearts for transplantation

Justin Godown, Kurt R. Schumacher, Alison Butler, Gretchen Chapman, Anne I. Dipchand, Whitney W. Kaslow, David W. Bearl, Richard Kirk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Heart transplant providers often focus on post-transplant outcomes when making donor decisions, potentially at the expense of higher waitlist mortality. This study aimed to assess public opinion regarding the selection of donor hearts and the balance between pre- and post-transplant risk. The authors generated a survey to investigate public opinion regarding donor acceptance. The survey was shared freely online across social media platforms in April-May 2019. A total of 718 individuals responded to the survey, with an equal distribution between patients and family members. Respondents consistently favored post-transplant outcomes over waitlist outcomes. About 83.9% of respondents favored a hospital with longer waitlist times, worse waitlist outcomes, but excellent post-transplant survival over a hospital with short waitlist times, a high waitlist survival, and inferior post-transplant survival. This preference was no different between pediatric and adult populations (P =.7), patient and family members (P =.935), or those with a pre- vs post-transplant perspective (P =.985). Patients and their family members consistently favor improved post-transplant survival over waitlist survival when considering the risks of accepting a donor organ. These findings suggest that current practice patterns of donor selection align with the opinions of patients and family members with heart failure or who have undergone heart transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13589
JournalPediatric Transplantation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Heart Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Survival
Donor Selection
Public Opinion
Social Media
Decision Making
Heart Failure
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pediatrics
Mortality

Keywords

  • behavioral economics
  • deceased donor
  • decision-making
  • heart transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Godown, J., Schumacher, K. R., Butler, A., Chapman, G., Dipchand, A. I., Kaslow, W. W., ... Kirk, R. (Accepted/In press). Patients and their family members prioritize post-transplant survival over waitlist survival when considering donor hearts for transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation, [e13589]. https://doi.org/10.1111/petr.13589

Patients and their family members prioritize post-transplant survival over waitlist survival when considering donor hearts for transplantation. / Godown, Justin; Schumacher, Kurt R.; Butler, Alison; Chapman, Gretchen; Dipchand, Anne I.; Kaslow, Whitney W.; Bearl, David W.; Kirk, Richard.

In: Pediatric Transplantation, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Godown, Justin ; Schumacher, Kurt R. ; Butler, Alison ; Chapman, Gretchen ; Dipchand, Anne I. ; Kaslow, Whitney W. ; Bearl, David W. ; Kirk, Richard. / Patients and their family members prioritize post-transplant survival over waitlist survival when considering donor hearts for transplantation. In: Pediatric Transplantation. 2019.
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