Patients With NASH and Cryptogenic Cirrhosis Are Less Likely Than Those With Hepatitis C to Receive Liver Transplants

Jacqueline G. O'Leary, Carmen Landaverde, Linda Jennings, Robert M. Goldstein, Gary L. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background & Aims: Many patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) have other conditions associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that put them at risk for complications that preclude orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: We followed all patients with NASH and CC who were evaluated for OLT (n = 218) at Baylor Simmons Transplant Institute between March 2002 and May 2008. Data were compared with those from patients evaluated for OLT because of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis (n = 646). Results: Patients with NASH and CC were older, more likely to be female, had a higher body mass index, and a greater prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, compared with patients with HCV-associated cirrhosis, but the 2 groups had similar model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores. NASH and CC in patients with MELD scores ≤15 were less likely to progress; these patients were less likely to receive OLT and more likely to die or be taken off the wait list because they were too sick, compared with patients with HCV-associated cirrhosis. The median progression rate among patients with NASH and CC was 1.3 MELD points per year versus 3.2 MELD points per year for the HCV group (P = 003). Among patients with MELD scores >15, there were no differences among groups in percentage that received transplants or rate of MELD score progression. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurred in 2.7% of patients with NASH and CC per year, compared with 4.7% per year among those with HCV-associated cirrhosis. Conclusions: Patients with NASH and CC and low MELD scores have slower disease progression than patients with HCV-associated cirrhosis and are less likely to receive OLT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Transplants
End Stage Liver Disease
Liver
Hepacivirus
Liver Transplantation
Fibrosis
Cryptogenic Cirrhosis
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Disease Progression
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Body Mass Index
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Cirrhosis
  • Fatty Liver
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver Transplantation
  • NASH

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

Patients With NASH and Cryptogenic Cirrhosis Are Less Likely Than Those With Hepatitis C to Receive Liver Transplants. / O'Leary, Jacqueline G.; Landaverde, Carmen; Jennings, Linda; Goldstein, Robert M.; Davis, Gary L.

In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 9, No. 8, 01.08.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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