Patterns of Pretreatment Reward Task Brain Activation Predict Individual Antidepressant Response: Key Results From the EMBARC Randomized Clinical Trial

Kevin P. Nguyen, Cherise Chin Fatt, Alex Treacher, Cooper Mellema, Crystal Cooper Cortes, Manish K. Jha, Benji Kurian, Maurizio Fava, Patrick J. McGrath, Myrna Weissman, Mary L. Phillips, Madhukar H. Trivedi, Albert A. Montillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The lack of biomarkers to inform antidepressant selection is a key challenge in personalized depression treatment. This work identifies candidate biomarkers by building deep learning predictors of individual treatment outcomes using reward processing measures from functional magnetic resonance imaging, clinical assessments, and demographics. Methods: Participants in the EMBARC (Establishing Moderators and Biosignatures of Antidepressant Response in Clinical Care) study (n = 222) underwent reward processing task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and were randomized to 8 weeks of sertraline (n = 106) or placebo (n = 116). Subsequently, sertraline nonresponders (n = 37) switched to 8 weeks of bupropion. The change in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was measured after treatment. Reward processing, clinical measurements, and demographics were used to train treatment-specific deep learning models. Results: The predictive model for sertraline achieved R2 of 48% (95% CI, 33%–61%; p < 10−3) in predicting the change in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and number-needed-to-treat (NNT) of 4.86 participants in predicting response. The placebo model achieved R2 of 28% (95% CI, 15%–42%; p < 10−3) and NNT of 2.95 in predicting response. The bupropion model achieved R2 of 34% (95% CI, 10%–59%, p < 10−3) and NNT of 1.68 in predicting response. Brain regions where reward processing activity was predictive included the prefrontal cortex and cerebellar crus 1 for sertraline and the cingulate cortex, caudate, orbitofrontal cortex, and crus 1 for bupropion. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate the utility of reward processing measurements and deep learning to predict antidepressant outcomes and to form multimodal treatment biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-560
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume91
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2022

Keywords

  • Antidepressants
  • Deep learning
  • Depression
  • Precision medicine
  • Treatment selection
  • fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

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