Pelvic ring disruptions: Prediction of associated injuries, transfusion requirement, pelvic arteriography, complications, and mortality

Adam J. Starr, Damian R. Griffin, Charles M. Reinert, William H. Frawley, Joan Walker, Shelley N. Whitlock, Drake S. Borer, Ashutosh V. Rao, Alan L. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine if age, fracture pattern, systolic blood pressure on arrival, base deficit, or the Revised Trauma Score is predictive of mortality, transfusion requirements, use of pelvic arteriography, later complications, or injuries associated with the pelvic ring disruption. Study Design: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database. Methods: All closed pelvic ring disruptions seen between November 1, 1997 and November 30, 1999 were included. Predictive variables and outcome variables were recorded for each patient. Statistical analysis was used to determine if the above variables were predictive. Results: Shock on arrival and the Revised Trauma Score were significantly associated with mortality, transfusion requirement, Injury Severity Score, and all the Abbreviated Injury Scores except the one for skin. In addition, the Revised Trauma Score was significantly associated with the use of pelvic arteriography and predicted more complications than did shock on arrival. Age was significantly associated with transfusion requirement, Injury Severity Score, the chest and skin Abbreviated Injury Scores, use of arteriography, and death. The mortality rate among patients who presented in shock was 57 percent. A Revised Trauma Score of less than 11 predicted mortality with a sensitivity and specificity of 58 percent and 92 percent, respectively. Shock on arrival predicted mortality with a sensitivity and specificity of 27 percent and 96 percent, respectively. Age greater than sixty years predicted mortality with a sensitivity and specificity of 26 percent and 91 percent, respectively. In our analysis of the fracture patterns, we were unable to demonstrate consistent, meaningful links between specific fracture classes and the outcome variables. Conclusions: Shock on arrival and the Revised Trauma Score are useful predictors of mortality and transfusion requirements, Injury Severity Score, and Abbreviated Injury Scores for the head and neck, face, chest, abdomen, and extremities. In addition, the Revised Trauma Score predicts the use of pelvic arteriography and later complications. Age predicted transfusion requirement, Injury Severity Score, the chest and skin Abbreviated Injury Scores, use of arteriography, and death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-561
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of orthopaedic trauma
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2002

Keywords

  • Age
  • Fracture classification
  • Pelvic fracture
  • Revised trauma score
  • Shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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