Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer

E. N. Ballard, V. T. Trinh, R. T. Hogg, R. D. Gerard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild-type adenovirus in those cells. Nevertheless, the incorporation of relatively low affinity peptide ligands into the fiber knob, while effective in vitro, has only minimal targeting efficacy in vivo and highlights the importance of high affinity ligand:receptor interactions to achieve tumor targeting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-488
Number of pages13
JournalCancer Gene Therapy
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • adenovirus
  • aminopeptidase N
  • integrin
  • peptide
  • targeting
  • tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ballard, E. N., Trinh, V. T., Hogg, R. T., & Gerard, R. D. (2012). Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer. Cancer Gene Therapy, 19(7), 476-488. https://doi.org/10.1038/cgt.2012.23