Perceived Recovery and Self-Reported Functioning in Adolescents with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Sleep, Mood, and Physical Symptoms

Brittany Wright, K. Wilmoth, S. B. Juengst, N. Didehbani, R. Maize, C. M. Cullum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the contributions of anxiety, depressive, and concussion symptoms and sleep quality to self-perceived recovery in adolescents with concussion. Method: Adolescents aged 12–20 (n = 298) completed anxiety, depression, concussion symptoms, and sleep measures at an initial concussion clinic visit and three-month follow-up. At follow-up, they reported self-perceived recovery as percent back to normal. Results: Injury-related factors alone did not predict self-perceived recovery (R2Adj =.017, p =.074). More concurrent physical, mental health, and sleep symptoms explained 18.8% additional variance in poorer self-perceived recovery (R2Adj Change =.188, p <.05). Physical symptoms (Bstand = −.292) and anxiety (Bstand = −.260) accounted for the most variance in self-perceived recovery. Conclusion: Post-concussive symptoms, in particular anxiety and self-reported physical symptoms, seem to characterize protracted recovery. Self-perceived recovery as an outcome measure may provide a more holistic understanding of adolescents’ experiences after concussion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalDevelopmental Neurorehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • concussion
  • mTBI
  • mood
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Rehabilitation
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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