Peritoneal dialysis: A primary care perspective

Ramesh Saxena, Cheryl West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the population of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) grows at an alarming rate, primary care physicians will increasingly be involved in the management of these patients. Early recognition of CKD and timely referral to a nephrologist when glomerular filtration rate approaches 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 is extremely important to improve ESRD outcome and appropriate selection of dialysis modality. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) remains a viable treatment option for ESRD patients. PD is less expensive dialysis modality and may provide a survival advantages over hemodialysis in first 2 to 4 years of treatment. Preserving residual renal function (RRF) is of paramount importance to prolong the survival outcomes in PD patients. Thus preservation of RRF is an important goal in the management of PD patients. Every effort should be made to avoid nephrotoxic drugs like aminoglycosides and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and limit the use of radiocontrast agents in PD patients with RRF. Judicious use of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent peritonitis would further help to reduce morbidity from PD. Protecting peritoneal membrane from long-term toxic and metabolic effects of the conventional glucose-based solutions is another objective to further improve PD outcome. Development of new, more biocompatible PD solutions holds promise for the future. One such solution, icodextrin, is now approved for use in the United States. Although extremely safe to use, it is associated with unique metabolic effects that may concern primary care physicians. They include false elevation of blood glucose, a reversible increase in serum alkaline phosphatase and a false decline in serum amylase. Monitoring of glycemia by assays that use glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone enzymes should be avoided and serum amylase alone should not be relied on in diagnosing pancreatitis in patients on icodextrin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-389
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Peritoneal Dialysis
Primary Health Care
Chronic Kidney Failure
glucose dehydrogenase (pyrroloquinoline-quinone)
Primary Care Physicians
Amylases
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Kidney
Dialysis
Serum
Survival
Poisons
Dialysis Solutions
Aminoglycosides
Peritonitis
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pancreatitis
Contrast Media
Alkaline Phosphatase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Peritoneal dialysis : A primary care perspective. / Saxena, Ramesh; West, Cheryl.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 4, 2006, p. 380-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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