Persistent enhancement of neuron-glia signaling mediated by increased extracellular K+ accompanying long-term synaptic potentiation

Woo Ping Ge, Shumin Duan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuron-glia signaling is important for neural development and functions. This signaling may be regulated by neuronal activity and undergo modification similar to long-term potentiation (LTP) of neuronal synapses, a hallmark of neuronal plasticity. We found that tetanic stimulation of Schaffer collaterals (Sc) in the hippocampus that induced LTP in neurons also resulted in LTP-like persistent elevation of Sc-evoked slow depolarization in perisynaptic astrocytes. The elevated slow depolarization in astrocytes was abolished by NMDA receptor antagonist and K+ channel inhibitors, but not by Ca2 + chelator BAPTA loaded in the recorded astrocytes, suggesting involvement of an increased extracellular K+ accumulation accompanying LTP of neuronal synapses. The increased K+ accumulation and astrocyte depolarization after LTP induction may reduce the efficiency of glial glutamate transporters, which may contribute to the enhanced synaptic efficacy. The neuronal activity-induced persistent enhancement of neuron- glia signaling may thus have important physiological relevance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2564-2569
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

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Long-Term Potentiation
Neuroglia
Astrocytes
Neurons
Hippocampus
Synapses
Amino Acid Transport System X-AG
Neuronal Plasticity
Chelating Agents
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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Persistent enhancement of neuron-glia signaling mediated by increased extracellular K+ accompanying long-term synaptic potentiation. / Ge, Woo Ping; Duan, Shumin.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 97, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 2564-2569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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