Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of two calcium supplements in postmenopausal women

H. J. Heller, L. G. Greer, S. D. Haynes, J. R. Poindexter, C. Y C Pak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This randomized crossover study compared the single-dose bioavailability and effects on parathyroid function of two commercially formulated calcium supplements containing 500 mg of elemental calcium. Twenty-five postmenopausal women underwent three phases of study wherein they each took a single dose of calcium citrate with a standard breakfast (as Citracal® 250 mg+ D), calcium carbonate (as Os-Cal® 500 mg+ D), or placebo at 8 a.m. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and hourly for 4 or 6 hours after each dose. Fasting and postload urine samples were also collected. Compared with calcium carbonate, calcium citrate provided a 46% greater peak-basal variation and 94% higher change in area under the curve for serum calcium and a 41% greater increment in urinary calcium. Moreover, the decrement in serum parathyroid hormone concentration from baseline was greater after calcium citrate. In conclusion, calcium citrate is more bioavailable than calcium carbonate when given with a meal. (C) 2000 the American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1237-1244
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume40
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000

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Calcium Citrate
Calcium Carbonate
Pharmacokinetics
Calcium
Breakfast
Parathyroid Hormone
Serum
Cross-Over Studies
Biological Availability
Area Under Curve
Meals
Fasting
Placebos
Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of two calcium supplements in postmenopausal women. / Heller, H. J.; Greer, L. G.; Haynes, S. D.; Poindexter, J. R.; Pak, C. Y C.

In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 40, No. 11, 2000, p. 1237-1244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heller, H. J. ; Greer, L. G. ; Haynes, S. D. ; Poindexter, J. R. ; Pak, C. Y C. / Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of two calcium supplements in postmenopausal women. In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2000 ; Vol. 40, No. 11. pp. 1237-1244.
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