Phase III study of cisplatin with or without paclitaxel in stage IVB, recurrent, or persistent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study

David H. Moore, John A. Blessing, Richard P. McQuellon, Howard T. Thaler, David Cella, Jo Benda, David S. Miller, George Olt, Stephanie King, John F. Boggess, Thomas F. Rocereto

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415 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether cisplatin plus paclitaxel (C+P) improved response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), or survival compared with cisplatin alone in patients with stage IVB, recurrent, or persistent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with measurable disease, performance status (PS) 0 to 2, and adequate hematologic, hepatic, and renal function received either cisplatin 50 mg/m2 or C+P (cisplatin 50 mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for six cycles. Tumor measurements and quality-of-life (QOL) assessments were obtained before each treatment cycle. Results: Of 280 patients entered, 6% were ineligible. Among 264 eligible patients, 134 received cisplatin and 130 received C+P. Groups were well matched with respect to age, ethnicity, PS, tumor grade, disease site, and number of cycles received. The majority of all patients had prior radiation therapy (cisplatin, 92%; C+P, 91%). Objective responses occurred in 19% (6% complete plus 13% partial) of patients receiving cisplatin versus 36% (15% complete plus 21% partial) receiving C+P (P = .002). The median PFS was 2.8 and 4.8 months, respectively, for cisplatin versus C+P (P < .001). There was no difference in median survival (8.8 months v 9.7 months). Grade 3 to 4 anemia and neutropenia were more common in the combination arm. There was no significant difference in QOL scores, although a disproportionate number of patients (cisplatin, n = 50; C+P, n = 33) dropped out of the QOL component, presumably because of increasing disease, deteriorating health status, or early death. Conclusion: C+P is superior to cisplatin alone with respect to response rate and PFS with sustained QOL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3113-3119
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume22
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Moore, D. H., Blessing, J. A., McQuellon, R. P., Thaler, H. T., Cella, D., Benda, J., Miller, D. S., Olt, G., King, S., Boggess, J. F., & Rocereto, T. F. (2004). Phase III study of cisplatin with or without paclitaxel in stage IVB, recurrent, or persistent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 22(15), 3113-3119. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2004.04.170