Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels

Bertrand Coste, Bailong Xiao, Jose S. Santos, Ruhma Syeda, Jãrg Grandl, Kathryn S. Spencer, Sung Eun Kim, Manuela Schmidt, Jayanti Mathur, Adrienne E. Dubin, Mauricio Montal, Ardem Patapoutian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

391 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanotransduction has an important role in physiology. Biological processes including sensing touch and sound waves require as-yet-unidentified cation channels that detect pressure. Mouse Piezo1 (MmPiezo1) and MmPiezo2 (also called Fam38a and Fam38b, respectively) induce mechanically activated cationic currents in cells; however, it is unknown whether Piezo proteins are pore-forming ion channels or modulate ion channels. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Piezo (DmPiezo, also called CG8486) also induces mechanically activated currents in cells, but through channels with remarkably distinct pore properties including sensitivity to the pore blocker ruthenium red and single channel conductances. MmPiezo1 assembles as a ∼1.2-million-dalton homo-oligomer, with no evidence of other proteins in this complex. Purified MmPiezo1 reconstituted into asymmetric lipid bilayers and liposomes forms ruthenium-red-sensitive ion channels. These data demonstrate that Piezo proteins are an evolutionarily conserved ion channel family involved in mechanotransduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-181
Number of pages6
JournalNature
Volume483
Issue number7388
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 8 2012

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Porins
Ion Channels
Ruthenium Red
Biological Phenomena
Touch
Lipid Bilayers
Drosophila melanogaster
Liposomes
Cations
Proteins
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • General

Cite this

Coste, B., Xiao, B., Santos, J. S., Syeda, R., Grandl, J., Spencer, K. S., ... Patapoutian, A. (2012). Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels. Nature, 483(7388), 176-181. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10812

Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels. / Coste, Bertrand; Xiao, Bailong; Santos, Jose S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Grandl, Jãrg; Spencer, Kathryn S.; Kim, Sung Eun; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem.

In: Nature, Vol. 483, No. 7388, 08.03.2012, p. 176-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coste, B, Xiao, B, Santos, JS, Syeda, R, Grandl, J, Spencer, KS, Kim, SE, Schmidt, M, Mathur, J, Dubin, AE, Montal, M & Patapoutian, A 2012, 'Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels', Nature, vol. 483, no. 7388, pp. 176-181. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10812
Coste B, Xiao B, Santos JS, Syeda R, Grandl J, Spencer KS et al. Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels. Nature. 2012 Mar 8;483(7388):176-181. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10812
Coste, Bertrand ; Xiao, Bailong ; Santos, Jose S. ; Syeda, Ruhma ; Grandl, Jãrg ; Spencer, Kathryn S. ; Kim, Sung Eun ; Schmidt, Manuela ; Mathur, Jayanti ; Dubin, Adrienne E. ; Montal, Mauricio ; Patapoutian, Ardem. / Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels. In: Nature. 2012 ; Vol. 483, No. 7388. pp. 176-181.
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