Planning of catheter interventions for pulmonary artery stenosis

Improved measurement agreement with magnetic resonance angiography using identical angulations

Israel Valverde, Victoria Parish, Tarique Hussain, Eric Rosenthal, Philipp Beerbaum, Thomas Krasemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the current disagreement between the gold standard X-ray angiography (XRA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the measurement of peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS). Background: MRA may help planning of catheter interventions for PPAS. However, there are sources of disagreement between XRA and MRA as measures are performed differently. We hypothesized that agreement may improve if identical angulation views are used. Methods: In this retrospective study, 17 patients were included. Four independent observers analyzed the pictures in three technique modalities: (1) XRA, (2) cross-sectional-MRA: reformatted to obtain the perpendicular cut-off view of the vessel, and (3) angulated-MRA: reformatted using the same angulations used in XRA. We measured: (a) minimal diameter at stenosis, (b) vessel diameter 1 cm proximal, and (c) 1 cm distal to the stenosis. Results: While in elliptical vessels cross-sectional-MRA provided both the larger and smaller diameter, XRA and angulated-MRA typically provided only the larger diameter due to projections. We found poor agreement between the smaller diameter in cross-sectional-MRA and XRA. XRA underestimate the diameter at the three locations (<15-22%). However, there was a good agreement between the larger cross-sectional-MRA diameter and XRA. This further improved if MRA images were reformatted with the identical angulations used in XRA (angulated-MRA). Conclusions: Conventional cross-sectional-MRA measurements of PPAS only moderately agree with XRA. However, using identical angulations in MRA reduces the bias. Hence, MRA is a valuable tool for planning angulations and measurements of PPAS prior to catheter interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-408
Number of pages9
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume77
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2011

Fingerprint

Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Catheters
Angiography
X-Rays
Pulmonary Artery Stenosis
Pathologic Constriction

Keywords

  • congenital heart defects
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • tetralogy of Fallot

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Planning of catheter interventions for pulmonary artery stenosis : Improved measurement agreement with magnetic resonance angiography using identical angulations. / Valverde, Israel; Parish, Victoria; Hussain, Tarique; Rosenthal, Eric; Beerbaum, Philipp; Krasemann, Thomas.

In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 77, No. 3, 15.02.2011, p. 400-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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