Pleased to be pregnant? Positive pregnancy attitudes among sexually active adolescent females in the United States

May Lau, Hua Lin, Glenn Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To identify factors associated with a positive pregnancy attitude among sexually active US teen females. Design: Secondary database analysis of the National Survey of Family Growth. Participants: Adolescent females 15-19 years old. Setting: Nationally representative sample. Methods: Bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed of the 2002 and 2006-08 cycles to examine whether sociodemographic factors, contraceptive history, sexual education and behavior history, medical services history, and family and sexual attitudes were associated with a positive pregnancy attitude among sexually active teen females. Results: Among the 975 sexually active US adolescent females surveyed, 15% reported a positive pregnancy attitude. Compared with adolescent females with a negative pregnancy attitude, those females with a positive pregnancy attitude were significantly (P < .05) more likely to have public insurance (43% vs 20%), to be poor (33% vs 10%), to have reached menarche at an earlier age (12 years old vs 13 years old), ever have HIV tested (35% vs 23%), but less likely to have ever been forced to have sex (1% vs 10%). In multivariable analyses, Latino race/ethnicity was associated with triple the odds, and African-American double the odds, of a positive pregnancy attitude. Older age of menarche and higher family income were associated with reduced odds of a positive pregnancy attitude. Conclusions: One in 7 sexually active US adolescent females had a positive pregnancy attitude. Minority race/ethnicity was associated with greater odds of a positive pregnancy attitude, whereas older age of menarche and a higher family income were associated with lower odds of a positive pregnancy attitude. Assessing pregnancy attitudes for these groups of adolescent females might prove useful to decrease adolescent pregnancy rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-215
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Pregnancy
Menarche
Medical History Taking
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Reproductive History
Pregnancy Rate
Insurance
Hispanic Americans
Sexual Behavior
African Americans
History
HIV
Databases
Education
Growth

Keywords

  • Adolescent pregnancy
  • Attitudes
  • Risk factors
  • Secondary database analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pleased to be pregnant? Positive pregnancy attitudes among sexually active adolescent females in the United States. / Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn.

In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Vol. 27, No. 4, 2014, p. 210-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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