Point-of-care testing for prothrombin time, but not activated partial thromboplastin time, correlates with laboratory methods in patients receiving aprotinin or epsilon-aminocaproic acid while undergoing cardiac surgery

Tak Shun Choi, Philip E. Greilich, Chen Shi, James S. Wilson, Amy Keller, Martin H. Kroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Point-of-care testing (POCT) of coagulation parameters can help optimize transfusion practice in cardiac surgery. Antifibrinolytic agents may interfere with the laboratory and/or POCT coagulation assays. This randomized controlled study compared coagulation parameters obtained from a whole blood POCT coagulation device with a typical laboratory instrument in cardiac surgery patients receiving aprotinin, epsilon-aminocaproic acid, or normal saline before undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. Aliquots of arterial blood samples from 42 patients were collected perioperatively, and their prothrombin times (PTs) and activated partial thromboplastin times (aPTTs) were measured by POCT and laboratory instrumentation. Linear regression and error analyses were used for the method comparison. For PT, the POCT device compared favorably with the laboratory method. For aPTT, the POCT device did not compare well with the laboratory method. Treatment with antifibrinolytic agents does not interfere with determination of PT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-78
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of clinical pathology
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2002

Keywords

  • Aprotinin
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Comparison study
  • Epsilon-aminocaproic acid
  • Linear regression
  • PT
  • Point-of-care testing
  • aPTT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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