Poor baroreflex gain is a marker of heightened sympathetic activity post-tachycardia termination in humans

Robert C. Kowal, Stephen L. Wasmund, Michael L. Smith, Richard L. Page, Jose A. Joglar, Mohamed H. Hamdan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We hypothesized that sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) remains elevated after tachycardia termination in patients with low baroreflex gain (BRG), and decreased to or below baseline in patients with high BRG. In a cohort of patients who participated in a previously published study [3], BRG, SNA, blood pressure, and central venous pressure were measured immediately after the termination of simulated tachycardia. While the hemodynamic responses following tachycardia termination were similar in both groups, SNA remained elevated in patients with low BRG compared to a decrease below baseline levels in patients with high BRG (p = 0.04). Increased sympathetic activity following tachycardia termination could be arrhythmogenic and might play a role in the genesis of recurrent ventricular arrhythmias following tachycardia termination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-446
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Autonomic Research
Volume13
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003

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Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Baroreceptors
  • Sympathetic nerve activity
  • Tachycardia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Kowal, R. C., Wasmund, S. L., Smith, M. L., Page, R. L., Joglar, J. A., & Hamdan, M. H. (2003). Poor baroreflex gain is a marker of heightened sympathetic activity post-tachycardia termination in humans. Clinical Autonomic Research, 13(6), 443-446.